Triathlete Europe http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com Europe's leading source for triathlon news and information. Thu, 18 Sep 2014 12:35:55 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Interbike 2014: The Best In Tri http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/interbike-2014-the-best-in-tri http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/interbike-2014-the-best-in-tri#comments Thu, 18 Sep 2014 12:35:55 +0000 Aaron Hersh, Jené Shaw and Bethany Mavis http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=47015

Sometimes a subtle reminder can be more powerful than hours of wind tunnel data. Helmets are tricky for data-oriented companies because drag generated by the helmet is so dependent on the rider. A great solution for one person may be terrible for another. Lazer took another approach to reducing helmet drag with their new Wasp Air. A little device in the tail vibrates when the rider deviates from his position to offer a gentle reminder to stay in aero.

Over the course of the last week we’ve been examining some of the particulars from Interbike 2014. Today we make a few ]]>

Sometimes a subtle reminder can be more powerful than hours of wind tunnel data. Helmets are tricky for data-oriented companies because drag generated by the helmet is so dependent on the rider. A great solution for one person may be terrible for another. Lazer took another approach to reducing helmet drag with their new Wasp Air. A little device in the tail vibrates when the rider deviates from his position to offer a gentle reminder to stay in aero.

Over the course of the last week we’ve been examining some of the particulars from Interbike 2014. Today we make a few ‘awards’. Which triathlon products impressed us the most? These ones.

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Analysing The Right Run Metrics http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/analysing-the-right-run-metrics http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/analysing-the-right-run-metrics#comments Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:25:41 +0000 Jeff Gaudette http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=47025

Analysing metrics in the workplace is a familiar concept. Whether it be counting the visitors to a website, calculating the number of ]]>

Analysing metrics in the workplace is a familiar concept. Whether it be counting the visitors to a website, calculating the number of products sold, or measuring levels of employee satisfaction, we all have metrics in our daily lives that help us prioritise and assess the progress of our work.

Running is no different.

Runners implement metrics such as the speed of their tempo runs, the length of their long runs, and a variety of other quantitative measurements to help evaluate their development and ensure that they are on target to reach their goals.

However, as many business analysts will tell you, it’s far too easy to get caught up in focusing on the wrong metrics. If you sell purple t-shirts, having 1 million visitors to your website is a huge accomplishment. But, if none of those visitors buy your purple t-shirt, it’s a useless number.

In the working world, we’re well educated and often quite aware of the temptation and potential pitfalls of concentrating on the wrong metrics. Unfortunately, many runners are not aware that they might be too concerned with the wrong metrics in their training. The result is often frustration, stagnant race results, and injuries.

Here are a couple of common metrics many runners put too much focus on and tips on how you can shift your mindset should you fall victim to these familiar pitfalls.

Pacing Of Easy Runs
Want to know the most common question I receive from runners, both veteran and beginner?

“If I feel good, can I start running my easy runs faster?”

Before writing this article, I decided to count how many times I received this question in one week. I counted eight times.

The problem isn’t eight people asking the same question. The issue is that these runners are unnecessarily focused on the speed of their easy runs and think that by running faster on their easy days they will improve more rapidly.

Unfortunately, focusing on upping the pace of your easy runs is a vanity metric that does not correlate with your progress and contributes little to your fitness.

Aerobic development is roughly the same whether you’re running at 30 seconds or 2 minutes slower than marathon pace. For a 3:30 marathoner, this means that 8:30 pace essentially provides the same aerobic benefits as miles at 9:30 or 10:00 pace. However, running faster than an 8:30 pace only increases the time it takes for you to recover while providing little additional benefit aerobically. So, running faster is actually detrimental.

Probably the best example of how little your easy run pace matters is the training of Kenyan runners. Catherine Ndereba, who has a 2:18:47 marathon PR, often runs her easy run days at 7:00 – 7:30 pace, which is about 2 minutes slower than her marathon pace. By keeping the easy days slow, Kenyan runners like Ndereba are able to perform notoriously difficult workouts and take their performances to another level on race day. The Kenyans understand that increasing the pace on their easy days is not the most beneficial way to improve.

Your Takeaway: Running faster on your easy days is not important, nor is it a sign of increasing fitness. Focus instead on the purpose of easy runs — recovering from hard workouts and preparing the body for upcoming sessions.

Workouts As Fitness Measurements
It’s easy to get frustrated and feel like you’re going backwards after a tough workout. I’ve had more than a few training sessions in my career that lead me to wonder if I had somehow completely lost it. After one rough workout three weeks before an important 10K, my coach said something to me that I’ll never forget: “Workouts are for improving specific physiological systems, not for proving how fit you are. You prove your fitness on race day.”

That statement hit home and it’s something I’ve never forgotten.

When analysing workouts it’s tempting to compare splits and workout times to potential race performances. However, the two rarely correlate.

Perhaps you’re working on speed, which is a weaknesses for your predominantly slow twitch muscles, or you’re heading into the workout with tired legs to help simulate marathon fatigue. Regardless, you may find yourself running slower than expected or struggling to maintain race pace. This can be frustrating and demoralising if you’re always looking to measure your workout performance with race potential.

However, if you focus instead on executing the purpose of the workout and completing it to the best of your ability, you’re making progress physiologically, which will ultimately lead to a personal best on race day.

Your Takeaway: You should only use your workouts to measure progress when compared to similar workouts under similar conditions, not as a measurement of race times or potential. Remember, workouts are for improving specific physiological systems, not for proving how fit you are. You prove your fitness on race day.

The next time you’re analysing your training or looking for areas to improve, make sure you’re evaluating the right metrics or you could find yourself working hard with nothing to show for it.

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Dirk Bockel Blog: Increase Your Kona Performance http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/dirk-bockel-blog-increase-your-kona-performance http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/dirk-bockel-blog-increase-your-kona-performance#comments Thu, 18 Sep 2014 10:20:42 +0000 Dirk Bockel http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=47008

As part of our Road to Kona features, Dirk Bockel offers some advice for those looking to tune up their performance ahead of the big race. ]]>

As part of our Road to Kona features, Dirk Bockel offers some advice for those looking to tune up their performance ahead of the big race. Yesterday we gave you the chance to win a Pearl Izumi Tri Suit – for more on that click here.

With less than four weeks to the big dance in Kona, athletes are under pressure to hammer out perfect sessions that will help them shave minutes off of their overall time on race day. Right now it’s peak training time and it is a must to really focus on getting the big volume under your belt. I always feel that the last few weeks leading up to an Ironman have to be very precise and those key session need to be nailed, not only for your body, but also for the your mind.

My advice for you right now is to free yourself from other things and really focus on the next few weeks. You are undoubtedly tired and fatigued from training, so the time you commit to your goal is crucial and you need to focus even more on not to making any unnecessary mistakes. The less you have going on right now the better. Now is the time to prioritize training. Between those hard sessions it is absolutely necessary to give your body the rest that it needs in order to bounce back and be fresh. So when it’s on it is on and when it’s off, well then it’s off. It is more important than ever to draw clear lines and boundaries so that you are able to benefit from all of the hard work and sacrifices you have already made thus far.

Since I am not racing in Kona this year, I have a bit of extra time to reveal some of my secrets to success to racing well there. I have over a quarter of a century of top level triathlon racing experience, and in this series, I will be sharing some of the tips I have learned along the way. If you are interested in diving a deeper into my pool of knowledge (and into the amazing scenery of Tuscany), please come join me at the premier Gourmet Tri Experience next year! I am really excited to be able to make myself available to you there so you can pick my brain and get the info you need in order to train and race at your greatest potential.

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Laura Fidler Blog: End Of Season High http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/laura-fidler-blog-end-of-season-high http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/laura-fidler-blog-end-of-season-high#comments Thu, 18 Sep 2014 09:10:57 +0000 Laura Fidler http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=47011

So it’s the end of another triathlon season and I’m pleased to say that I can sit here this year with a more positive ]]>

So it’s the end of another triathlon season and I’m pleased to say that I can sit here this year with a more positive reflection of the year passed. 2013 for me was tough! It tested my physical and emotional resilience and made me question my intentions and commitments to triathlon. At the time I wasn’t sure I would be able to get back to feeling fit, being healthy and racing well.

I went into my first race this season with a lot of self doubt and negative emotion. Am I good enough? Why am I doing this again? But thankfully I raced well and realised that actually I can do this sport and I do have more to achieve. I backed this up with my best Euro finish to date: 9th overall and 2nd Brit in my age group. Then finally this year I finished 16th overall and 2nd Brit in my age group at the Worlds! Ok, no medals yet but some significant PB’s: nearly 3 minutes off my swim time, a massive 5 mins off my bike time but unfortunately no run PB’s this year – although every course I’ve raced has either been ridiculously hilly or slightly long so I’m not going to dwell on that too much!

So what’s next you may ask?! Well first of all I’m having a rest! 2-3 weeks of little to no exercise, eating whatever I want and chilling out with friends. Every year prior to this I have usually gone stir crazy, chomping at the bit for more training, but my virus last year taught me a hard lesson. Rest is your friend. So I’m embracing it with open arms…. Bring on the pizza, beer and cake!

Next step is planning. I’m looking forwards to sitting down with my coach and looking ahead to the 2015 season. It’s all about picking races and starting to formulate the perfect training formula. I love this part of the year because it always feels like a new beginning. It’s time to let the bad things go and focus on the new challenges. It’s time to be honest with yourself and reflect on your strengths and weaknesses. It’s easy to practice the things you’re good at but what about the things you’re not? This year I’m going crack the swim and run…

And finally it’s about spending time with the people who have allowed me to continue to pursue my dreams. The people who support me emotionally, physically and financially… I couldn’t commit so much time and energy to this sport without each and every one person in my team so I intend to spend some quality, non-Lycra clad time with you all to say thank you! I appreciate the ongoing support from sponsors Central Health Physiotherapy and third financial. The emotional support from friends and family and last but not least the practical support and guidance of my coach Paul Mill. As always I promise to continue to work hard, continue to push myself so that I can show you all what I can achieve!

Laura Fidler, GB Triathlete and Full-Time Physiotherapist, Central Health Physiotherapy. www.central-health.com, @CentralHealth, @LFids_Tri

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Preview: Alexander To Race ITU Long Distance Worlds http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/preview-alexander-to-race-itu-long-distance-worlds http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/18/preview-alexander-to-race-itu-long-distance-worlds#comments Thu, 18 Sep 2014 07:55:24 +0000 ITU Media http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=47006

After hosting ITU Long Distance Triathlon World Series Events the last four years, Weihai, China will for the first time welcome the ]]>

After hosting ITU Long Distance Triathlon World Series Events the last four years, Weihai, China will for the first time welcome the discipline at the World Championship level this weekend. The men’s and women’s start lists each feature a fresh mix of short course and long course talent lining up with names like Craig Alexander (AUS), Bertrand Billard (FRA), Greg Bennett (USA), Laura Bennett (USA), Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) and Andrea Hewitt (NZL) on the start lists.

The race will be held over two-lap 4km swim in the ocean, followed by a grueling three-lap hilly and technical 120km bike and will be finished off with a four-lap 20km seaside run. In addition to the elite titles, the event will see age group and paratriathlon races contested.

Women’s Preview
In her first and only ITU result, Melissa Hauschildt returns as the reigning queen of long distance triathlon. Despite her lack of ITU starts, Hauschildt is no stranger to triathlon – especially at longer distances as she is a two-time 70.3 Ironman World Champion. Since making the switch from steeplechase to triathlon in 2011, the Aussie has scored a host of first place finishes in the sport and that trend doesn’t appear to be changing any time soon.

Hauschildt will have successful short course competitors Laura Bennett and Andrea Hewitt, who are each two-time Olympians, to contend with. While their experience at this distance is limited in comparison to the defending champ, both appear to be in strong form. Bennett just won the Beijing triathlon against a talented field, while Hewitt capped off her World Triathlon Series schedule with an overall third-place finish.

Camilla Pederson (DEN) had a hold on the title last year until Hauschildt clawed her way back into gold-medal position despite a three-minute deficit off the bike, making Pederson settle for silver for the second consecutive year. Her hunger for the allusive gold will make her stiff competition in the women’s race.

Men’s Preview
Despite an absence from ITU racing since 2006, Craig Alexander is certainly one of the most notable athletes on the men’s start list. With three Ironman World Championship titles and another two 70.3 crowns on his CV, the only gold medal missing from his hardware collection is an ITU long distance one.

Six-time World Cup winner Greg Bennett stands to serve as Alexander’s top competition, as does defending champion Bertrand Billard. Last year was the Frenchman’s first long distance title, which he won in commanding fashion thanks to an impressive bike leg.

Jens Toft, who finished with the fourth-fastest time in 2013, has the added advantage of having competed in Weihai in 2012 where he took silver. Former long distance triathlon champ Sylvain Sudrie (FRA) returns as one of the most successful ITU long distance triathletes on the line, having won gold, silver and bronze at the event in the past. However, Sudrie failed to finish in 2012 and fell to 13th last year, making his form questionable.

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Bike Check: Scott Plasma 5 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/bike-check-scott-plasma-5 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/bike-check-scott-plasma-5#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:35:07 +0000 Evan Rudd / VeloNews http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=46981

With a set of Zipp’s carbon clinchers – 808 rear and 404 front – the Plasma 5 is race ready off the showroom floor. Photo: Nils Nilsen

Scott unveiled two new models of the Plasma time trial bike in July shortly after Sebastian Kienle did his part to help promote the new ]]>

With a set of Zipp’s carbon clinchers – 808 rear and 404 front – the Plasma 5 is race ready off the showroom floor. Photo: Nils Nilsen

Scott unveiled two new models of the Plasma time trial bike in July shortly after Sebastian Kienle did his part to help promote the new models by winning the Ironman European Championship aboard a camouflaged Plasma 5, smashing the bike course record by nearly 10 minutes. The Plasma 5 made its stateside debut at Scott’s Interbike booth in Las Vegas last week.

The Plasma 5 integrates hydration with a nose-cone style detachable bottle and top tube storage box. Scott claims the Plasma 5 is seven percent faster than its predecessor, the Plasma 3, with the nose cone and top tube box mounted.

Scott partnered with Profile Design to create a fully adjustable cockpit with two stem and three base bar options that are compatible with most extensions. Scott also collaborated with Simon Smart, a former Formula One aerodynamicist who contributed to ENVE’s successful wheel designs to create the most aerodynamically efficient frame possible. The wind-cheating airfoil tube shapes resemble designs used by Trek, Cervelo and others, but the new Plasma is a claimed 14% stiffer compared to the Plasma 3. The Plasma 5 furthers the integration story with hidden front and rear brakes along with internal cable routing.

The Plasma 4 lacks the sleek integrated front bottle and stem found on the Plasma 5, but features the same general frame design. Both the Plasma 5 and 4 will be available with two different component packages and delivery is scheduled for late 2014.

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Pro Lessons Learned From Craig Alexander http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/pro-lessons-learned-from-craig-alexander http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/pro-lessons-learned-from-craig-alexander#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:30:54 +0000 Triathlete Europe http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=46994

Last month, Craig Alexander confirmed his intention to return to October’s Ironman World Championship. With his senior standing in the ]]>

Last month, Craig Alexander confirmed his intention to return to October’s Ironman World Championship. With his senior standing in the professional ranks, 41-year-old Alexander has served as an advisor and role model to many of the athletes that will line up alongside him in Kona. Alexander relishes his role as a mentor, eagerly sharing his experiences with his training partners, up and coming pros, aspiring age groupers and the athletes he works with through Sansego, his newly launched coaching and training camp company. In advance of his return to the Big Island and the race he has thrice conquered, I reached out to a few of Alexander’s fellow Kona-bound pros to learn how his influence has impacted their careers.

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Win a Pearl Izumi Tri-suit with Uplace-BMC Pro Triathlon Team http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/win-a-pearl-izumi-tri-suit-with-uplace-bmc-pro-triathlon-team http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/win-a-pearl-izumi-tri-suit-with-uplace-bmc-pro-triathlon-team#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:15:43 +0000 Uplace-BMC Pro Triathlon Team http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=46954

The countdown to Kona is well and truly on! To celebrate, we’ve teamed up with the guys at Uplace-BMC Pro Triathlon Team to bring you ]]>

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The countdown to Kona is well and truly on! To celebrate, we’ve teamed up with the guys at Uplace-BMC Pro Triathlon Team to bring you yet another fantastic competition. In today’s ‘Race like a Kona Pro’ contest you can win a Pearl Izumi Tri-suit.

All you have to do is answer this simple question:
How many times has Corinne Abraham already raced the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii? Enter the competition now!
(Hint: read Corinne’s blog on Triathlete Europe or search social media).
If you missed the first competition don’t worry – you can still enter to win a Sailfish Attack wetsuit, Enter the first competition now!

And here’s the kicker!!
If you participate in every contest leading up to the Ironman World Championship on Saturday 11th October, you have the chance to win the whole package in the final contest, together with a world class triathlon bike from BMC Switzerland, the BMC TM02. 

Follow the Uplace-BMC blogs on Triathlete Europe and on the Uplace-BMC’s social media and win all the gear to race like a real Kona Pro, you can win one of the following prices:
1 Sailfish Attack wetsuit
1 Pearl Izumi tri-suit
1 pair of Shimano TR60 triathlon shoes
1 Giro Air Attack TT helmet
1 Etixx Sports Nutrition packet
Adidas Tycane pro race glasses
10 Tacx drinking bottles
A fi’zi:k Tritone K:ium saddle
A set of Continental tyres
5 pair of Compressport race socks
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Road To Kona Q&A: Corinne Abraham http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/road-to-kona-qa-corinne-abraham http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/road-to-kona-qa-corinne-abraham#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:10:23 +0000 Uplace-BMC Pro Triathlon Team http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=47001

As part of our Uplace-BMC Pro Triathlon Team Road to Kona we’ve caught up with Great British hopeful Corinne Abraham to find out ]]>

As part of our Uplace-BMC Pro Triathlon Team Road to Kona we’ve caught up with Great British hopeful Corinne Abraham to find out about her preparation and expectations for the 2014 Ironman World Championships.

How do you feel about Kona?
I will participate for the second time in Kona at the Ironman World Championship. I raced here first in 2010 as an age group athlete and the following year, in 2011, I turned professional. So this is my first year racing as a professional on the Big Island. So far this year, it has been a good year: I placed third in the IM Lanzarote and I won the European Championship in Frankfurt. The training has been tough, but I am looking forward to racing all the other girls.

What are your personal ambitions for Kona?
My personal ambitions for Kona are to have a good race, I would like to feel that I have done the best that I can do as an athlete. I would like to have a strong swim, knowing that the swim is normally not my strongest element of the race. Usually I come through on the bike, once I found my bike legs and I tend to continue to make an impression on the run. Certainly, my ambitions are to race well and to feel I get the most out of myself and obiously I would like to see how I fare against the other top girls in a World Championship. I look forward to a good race.

What do you think about the race conditions in Kona?
Every race we try to prepare for the specific conditions of that race. Here in Kona in particular, it is hot, windy and humid. So you try to prepare for those conditions in the best you can. It was good to race Lanzarote earlier this year. Particularly a hilly race, but also hot and windy. It is good to experience those in your training in order to prepare for the big day.

What is your training focus during the last month before the race?
The training now, in the last month in the build-up to the race, has a lot of speed and tempo work, so a lot of race specific and above race pace type work. It is a kind of training that generally takes more time to recover from. But now particularly in the 4 to 5 weeks to come the rest and the recovery become even more important. I am really doing everything you need for my A-race of the year. Every element of the training session has obviously its own goals and its own purpose. But than alongside that the nutrition and the recovery become also more and more important. This is what I will be focussing on in the next 4 to 5 weeks.

What makes Hawaii so special for you?
I think that Hawaii is a special race for everybody, because it is the only opportunity to race all the best people in the sport. There is no other opportunity during the year to do that. That on its own makes the World Championship in Kona a very special race.

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ashmei Launch Into Cycle & Triathlon http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/ashmei-launch-into-cycle-triathlon http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/09/17/ashmei-launch-into-cycle-triathlon#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:55:17 +0000 Press Release http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=46979 Award winning sportswear brand “ashmei” are launching their range of high performance cycle and triathlon clothing via a pop up store in Shoreditch, London at the end of October.

ashmei quickly established themselves as the “Finest Running Apparel in the World” with their range of stylish apparel but founder Stuart Brooke added “The real beauty is how the gear performs. ashmei is a game changer and we only launch product that we know will completely outperform our closest competitor. We have a no compromise approach to the design and development of our clothing and performance is the driving force behind the brand with many of the bespoke fabrics being developed by them. Quality and Style come as standard but always play 2nd fiddle to Performance”

The range is available to preview at the store or online with any pre-orders obtaining a discount. For more information please see their website.

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