Triathlete Europe http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com Europe's leading source for triathlon news and information. Sat, 25 Oct 2014 09:00:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 ‘Prevent, Prepare, Preform’ – Foam Rolling http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/25/prevent-prepare-preform-foam-rolling http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/25/prevent-prepare-preform-foam-rolling#comments Sat, 25 Oct 2014 09:00:49 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48116

Join Alex in this interactive foam rolling session and learn the value of releasing your body not just for injury prevention, but one of ]]>

Join Alex in this interactive foam rolling session and learn the value of releasing your body not just for injury prevention, but one of performance. Alex will help you develop your understanding of how the shut down body can effect both your training and competition and show you in practical terms how by doing some choice release techniques you can realise better mobility, strength, power and balance.

When talking about the subject of tissue, fascia and immobility, these topics are generally left for the physio or massage therapist to deal with. Alex, where appropriate, puts the reliance back on you to help to deal with these areas on a daily basis. The body is an ever evolving beast and depending on the demands of training, sport and even work it will respond accordingly.

Look at our natural suspension and propulsion systems when running. In basic terms, calfs and the quadriceps naturally absorb the impact at footstrike, whilst the glutes create the propulsion (movement forward). Imagine if the quads get bound down from poor run technique, cycling……. and reduce their ability to act as a shock absorber, the reliance would then be shunted to the calfs. The resultant effect of this would stress the calfs with the potential, change in running efficiency, tissue overload to the calf and achilles tendon, which may potentially lead to heel issues, plantar faciitis and nerve irritation.

Recovery isn’t just about rest as Performance isn’t just about swim, bike, run. There are things that we can do to firstly, reduce the incidence of injury and secondly give us a performance boost without getting out of your house.

Understanding and listening to your body is an art. So many times we ignore the signals and signs that are present and as a result we fall foul with either an injury or under perform at some level. In this session, Alex will both educate and up skill you in understanding your body and how by using the foam roller, realise its potential.

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Nine nutrition rules for novice triathletes http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/nine-nutrition-rules-for-novice-triathletes http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/nine-nutrition-rules-for-novice-triathletes#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 12:36:10 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48134

Photo: Jason R. Budd/TriRock Clearwater

A solid nutrition strategy will help your body make the most out of all your hours swimming, biking and running. We asked registered ]]>

Photo: Jason R. Budd/TriRock Clearwater

A solid nutrition strategy will help your body make the most out of all your hours swimming, biking and running. We asked registered dietitian (and multiple Ironman finisher!) Lauren Antonucci for her top nine rules for beginner triathletes looking to maximize their training. She shared advice she gives many of her multisport athletes through her business Nutrition Energy in New York City.

1. Keep a food log for 3–5 days at least twice per year for a nutrition “reality check.” Seeing your habits written down may clue you in on what you might be missing or going overboard on.

2. Eat carbs, every day, with most meals and always before and after workouts.

3. Don’t forget your fruits and veggies! Although we’ve heard this over and over, sometimes you get busy and the produce is the first thing to slip out of your diet. Eat 2–3 fruits and 4–6 veggies per day to optimize your weight and nutrient intake.

4. Be realistic about weight loss. Losing five pounds in 5–6 weeks is possible, 10 pounds in two weeks is not. When you’re looking to shed weight, slow and steady really does win the race, especially when you’re eating to support your training. And don’t be fooled by weight loss ads or supplements. Gimmicks do not work!

5. Recover right. Consume half a gram of carbs per pound of body weight, and 15–20 grams of protein within 30–60 min after training sessions or races.

6. Follow the 10 percent rule no matter what your nutrition and health goals are: Simply put, 10 percent of your total daily calories can come from splurges, treats or desserts. This keeps your glass of wine, square of dark chocolate or ice cream cone guilt-free, but also within your nutrition budget.

7. Plan healthy snacks! Two minutes per day is enough time to pack two nutritious snacks, and will save you hundreds of unwanted calories that you’d end up eating if you were not prepared with your own.

8. Avoid foods that are high in fat and fiber for both your pre-race dinner and morning-of breakfast to keep your gut happy during the race.

9. Eat breakfast 2–3 hours before your race to allow ample time to consume adequate calories and digest them before you toe the starting line.

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Three steps to stronger cycling http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/three-steps-to-stronger-cycling http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/three-steps-to-stronger-cycling#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 11:30:01 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48130

Photo: Shutterstock

Q: I’ve been riding for a few years and never seem to get faster. What can I do? The work needed to go faster on the bike requires you to ]]>

Photo: Shutterstock

Q: I’ve been riding for a few years and never seem to get faster. What can I do?

The work needed to go faster on the bike requires you to really stretch beyond your comfort level. Thankfully, we can train ourselves to adapt to the discomfort physically and mentally so that it becomes more tolerable.

Recruit fast-twitch fibers
Many triathletes spend a lot of time riding at a steady, low heart rate effort. While doing so has its place in a training plan, too many low-intensity rides will teach your body to go one speed. Instead, switch a midweek endurance ride for one interspersed with high-intensity intervals. This will allow your body to recruit fast-twitch fibres in the middle of a slow-twitch session. For example, include 4×2-mile efforts mid-ride at faster than race pace. Spin out for 3 to 5 minutes easy in between the hard efforts.

Measure your effort
Training with power is an effective way of learning to ride faster because it provides measurable, quantifiable data. Many athletes don’t know they can push substantially harder than they have been. A critical power test can yield your FTP (functional threshold power), which will establish effective training zones. The duration of intervals and rest will vary depending on goals.

Try a time trial
Triathletes rarely go all out on the bike because they have to save something for the run, but doing so in a time trial can build discomfort tolerance. Many local cycling clubs host regular informal time trials. Sign up for a few shorter ones within a single training block and find that gear you’ve been neglecting. Like a power test, a time trial will hurt, but it’ll make riding fast in a triathlon feel a lot easier.

Suzanne Zelazo is a coach with Team Atomica in Toronto.

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60 minute session: Pick your distance swim http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/60-minute-session-pick-your-distance-swim http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/60-minute-session-pick-your-distance-swim#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:30:37 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48127

Photo: Shutterstock

Every Friday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!). This week’s swim workout comes from ]]>

Photo: Shutterstock

Every Friday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!). This week’s swim workout comes from coach Luis Vargas of Mark Allen Training. The main set is pick-your-distance for the allotted time, so the workout can be done by swimmers of all levels. “Swimmers may need someone to help them keep track of the time or have the times written on a board,” Vargas advises. “You can challenge yourself to try to swim as far as possible or you can go fast and short and get more rest.”

One-Hour Workout: Pick-Your-Distance Swim
Warm-up

200 easy swim
3×50 one left arm, one right arm, one Catch-up Drill with at least 10 seconds rest
3×50 one Catch-up Drill, one build, one hold the build speed with at least 10 seconds rest
3×50 descending so that last swim is fastest with at least 10 seconds rest

Main Set
25 swims of your choice of distance

The first swim is on a 2:30 send-off, then you’ll take five seconds of the send-off time in each subsequent swim until your 25th swim is in 30 seconds. Each swimmer has to decide how far to go and still get a little rest before the next send off comes up.

Cool-down
200 very easy

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Interview: Daniela Ryf’s Kona reflections http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/interview-daniela-ryfs-kona-reflections http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/interview-daniela-ryfs-kona-reflections#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:45:09 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48124

Daniela Ryf (SUI) finished second at the Ironman World Championship earlier this month. Photo: John David Becker

Two-time Olympian Daniela Ryf was well-known on the ITU circuit, but a relative unknown in long-course triathlon until she set the ]]>

Daniela Ryf (SUI) finished second at the Ironman World Championship earlier this month. Photo: John David Becker

Two-time Olympian Daniela Ryf was well-known on the ITU circuit, but a relative unknown in long-course triathlon until she set the professional circuit abuzz this season with a slew of standout successes. Ryf won her debut Ironman in Switzerland, one day after claiming victory at the 5150 European Championship in Zurich. She was equally successful in her second iron-distance, conquering Ironman Copenhagen. She also racked up two Ironman 70.3 wins (Switzerland and Wiesbaden) before earning the Ironman 70.3 World Championship title in Mont-Tremblant. And in her first Kona appearance, Ryf gave none other than now three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae a run for her money, holding off the hard-charging Aussie until the final miles of the marathon and ultimately finishing second, just two minutes back. Following the race I had a chance to catch up with Ryf to talk about her rookie Kona experience and learn more about this up-and-coming long-course talent.

I’m sure you received many, many messages of congratulations following your race in Kona. Which one was the most meaningful to you, and why?
The one from my coach Brett Sutton. He was one of the only ones who knew what I was capable of and to make him proud was a great achievement. We put out there our race plan before the start and I was very happy to be able to perform it almost like we planned it.

What’s something that surprised you about your first Kona experience?
I really didn’t know there were that many hills in Kona. I always thought it was totally flat. So for me, it was a great surprise on the bike, but then when I bonked at kilometer 30 on the run, the little hill out of the Energy Lab was one of the not so fun surprises!

You said that you were confident coming into Kona–in a way that did not at all sound arrogant, but rather just as an honest confidence in yourself and your ability. Where do you think you get that confidence, and have you always been that self-assured?
Brett Sutton helped me a lot this year to get my confidence back. I had good confidence in my good years of racing ITU, but after my biggest win at World Triathlon Championship Seoul in 2010, I had a few really hard years where I lost the trust in my body and my abilities. As an emotional person, lows like this can really give you some doubts. So I had to find a balance between these highs and lows again. For sure next to my highs I also had lows, like every athlete goes through.

Brett helped me get back to basics and just do what I like–train hard and not think too far ahead. In the beginning of the year I was just focusing on training and not thinking about racing too much. The way Brett believed in me was very motivating. He almost had to force me to race Kona, as I didn’t want to race in the beginning. Then I realized how great this opportunity was and I knew he would not send me to Kona if I wasn’t ready. Having raced quite a lot in July and August definitely gave me a lot of confidence, too.

Coming into Kona I knew I had done everything possible in training with the time I had before the race. I had a lot of respect for the race, but mainly just wanted to go out there and go as hard as I could. The bike split of Chrissie Wellington–4:52–was my target. That’s all I thought about when I thought about the bike. I knew if I could ride somewhere around there, I could have a chance to win. And that was my goal–to give it a try and put everything out there.

Do you feel that you’ve truly found your calling with half and full Ironman distance racing?
Yes, I definitely have. I love the 70.3 races, as you can go all out from start until end. I still have to build for the Ironman races, as I’m not fit enough yet to go hard from the start. By this time next year I hope I’ll be able to race all out from the start. I see it as a challenge–testing your body how long it holds it together. This year in Kona it was a great experience and I came to my limit on the run, where I have not been before in the other two Ironman races I did this year.

What do you love and what do you hate about Ironman racing?
To see how fast I can go is what drives me to push hard. I love pushing hard on the bike in Ironman and then seeing if I can hold it together in the run. I don’t have a hate moment yet in Ironman, but the early wake-up definitely isn’t my favourite part of the day!

As a newcomer to Kona and in general to long-course racing, people are curious to know more about you. What were you like as a little girl?
I always liked sports. We went hiking or skiing with the family. I started swimming when I was eight and athletics when I was 10. Already then I liked competing, although my mam had to sometimes give me a little push to go out there. I did lots of running races, which I loved.

Your mother was in Kona to support you. In what ways does she help you and in what ways does she inspire you? Who else is in your key inner circle?
Yes, it meant a lot to me that my mam was there to support me, as I know how much she hates flying. It was great to have her there with me. We shared an apartment and some nice wine two days before the race! Thanks to her I started with sports when I was very little. She always supported me with what I wanted to achieve and also taught me how be strong.

Jim Felt was there, too, which meant a lot to me, as he has become a good friend over the last few years. His support was amazing, as my bike arrived one day too late. Also Robbie and Susie Haywood, who helped me find my way around the race site. I met them last year through Brett in training camp. Robbie was the reason why I ended up doing my first Ironman in Zurich, as Brett was fed up with always telling me that I am made to race long distance. They were a huge help to me for this race.

There are also my girls at home, who I haven’t seen for ages. We all met at school around eight years ago and still keep close contact. They are the reason why I always love to come home.

Imagine your life 10 years down the road. What does it look like?
Hmm, that’s a long time to go. I have no idea. I hope I have finished my masters in Food Science and Management and have a job somewhere in the food industry for product development or marketing. I hope to still be active, but most likely not racing anymore. I may have a family and hopefully a very big house. The big house in Switzerland might be the biggest challenge–it’s very, very expensive!

Do you have any unusual personal quirks?
Oh I guess I have plenty of this. I’m not quite normal, even I wish I was!

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National Cross Duathlon Championships still open for entries http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/national-cross-duathlon-championships-still-open-for-entries http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/24/national-cross-duathlon-championships-still-open-for-entries#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:05:47 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48122 The triathlon and multisport season may be drawing to a close but the final Triathlon England Championships is yet to take place. The Evil Sheriff Off Road Duathlon, which doubles as the National Cross Duathlon Championships is set for 8 November in north Nottinghamshire and is still accepting entries.

Cross duathlon involves off road running and cycling using a mountain bike. The stunning venue at Sherwood Pines is a regular for off road cycling events, and the duathlon covers a 5km run, 20km bike and final 3.6km run to finish.

Competitors aiming for national titles need to ride a mountain bike and be a member of Triathlon England (29″ tyres are permitted). Athletes wishing to ride cross or hybrid bikes can still take part in the open race but won’t be eligible for national titles.

Organisers, One Step Beyond, are expecting a field of around 700 athletes and are staging a 10km run after the duathlon, aimed at supporters and family members. Entries are open until 9am on Monday 3 November. Subject to places still being available, further entries will be taken on the day, with an additional £5 fee. Payment on the day is cash only.

The Cross Duathlon is the sixth of six Triathlon England Championship events that have been fought out this season. For more information see www.onestepbeyond.org.uk/evil-sheriff-off-road-duathlon.php.

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Avoid negative thinking on the swim http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/avoid-negative-thinking-on-the-swim http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/avoid-negative-thinking-on-the-swim#comments Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:35:52 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48111

Things getting rough in the water? Combat negative thinking with these techniques. Photo: Endurapix/Thierry Sourbier

Your mental outlook toward swimming can have a tremendous effect on your results in the water. When things get challenging, do you stay ]]>

Things getting rough in the water? Combat negative thinking with these techniques. Photo: Endurapix/Thierry Sourbier

Your mental outlook toward swimming can have a tremendous effect on your results in the water. When things get challenging, do you stay positive and motivated or tend to go through bouts of negative self-talk? Negative thinking creates stress and destroys your self-confidence, which can hinder performance.

The process to change your feelings about swimming is more than just “think positive.” Self-talk for success must be positive, but it also needs to be believable and achievable. The first step is to be aware of your thoughts and actions before, during and after a swim practice. Listen to your internal monologue and make notes of how you are talking to yourself. Observe how you are presenting yourself to the world. Would you say the same things or act the same way toward your best friend while watching him or her swim?

The next step is to look at each negative thought with rational thinking. Challenge each one with a rational answer or explanation:

“I am a terrible swimmer.” Are you consistently putting in the pool hours to become a better swimmer? Are you receiving coaching and tips from knowledgeable resources? If you are swimming laps in a pool, you are a better swimmer than a large percentage of American adults who cannot cross the pool.

“I am going to be last out of the water in the race.” Your performance should not be judged by things outside of your control such as other participants. Commit to be the best you can be and don’t fixate on how you measure up to others.

“I am embarrassed by what the other swimmers think of me.” Surprise! No one in the pool is thinking about you, except for you! Everyone has his or her own internal monologue and it is often self-critical, so try to let it go.

Finally, replace the negative thoughts with positive ones and specific affirmations. What you say to yourself must be possible and believable in order for the self-talk to be effective:

I am training to become a better swimmer. I am practicing to achieve my goals.

I am prepared to complete the race. I am ready for everything that might reasonably happen in the open water.

I am doing the best I can. Other swimmers respect me for accepting the challenge of learning to swim.

Simple tips to stay positive
Smile each time you think about swimming, while you drive to the pool, and as you walk to your lane. Your external outlook can help shape your internal attitude.

Set short- and long-term goals that are measureable and attainable. Write them down and cross them off when achieved. You can easily forget how much you have improved since day one.

Ask questions. Seek help. Try new things. Sometimes the smallest change can result in the biggest improvement.

Allow yourself to forgive and forget. Don’t punish yourself after a bad set or experience at the pool. Analyze it with rational thoughts (e.g., Did I have to wake up extra early for work?) and then don’t allow yourself to dwell on the negative.

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Become a better climber on the bike http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/become-a-better-climber-on-the-bike http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/become-a-better-climber-on-the-bike#comments Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:30:44 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48108

Photo: Thierry Sourbier/Endurapix

Whether or not you consider yourself a king of the mountains, your bike doesn’t care if you are riding on a pancake-flat road or a ]]>

Photo: Thierry Sourbier/Endurapix

Whether or not you consider yourself a king of the mountains, your bike doesn’t care if you are riding on a pancake-flat road or a monstrous climb. It merely responds to a combination of how hard you push on the pedals (torque) and how fast you spin the cranks (angular velocity). The product of those two things is power (measured in watts).

Picture this: Your bike trainer is attached to a floor lamp with a 100-watt bulb. You can illuminate the lamp by pedaling the bike—either by shifting into a really hard gear and pedaling slowly or by spinning at a high cadence in an easy gear to reach your 100-watt goal. Either approach will get the job done, but an optimal middle ground is likely more sustainable.

So now I hear you saying, “Yep, I get all that, but I still suck at climbing!” Let’s make the assumption that you do not suck at riding on flat roads and, as mentioned previously, the bike doesn’t know the difference. Now, let’s apply the same skills that help make you a solid rider on flattish roads and put them into play on the hilly sections. Note that while these tips will make you a better all-around climber, they are specifically geared toward triathlon racing.

Effort management
Whether you are using perceived effort, a heart rate monitor, a power meter, or all three to help guide you toward an optimal bike split, you probably don’t make a habit of dramatically increasing your effort or speed while riding along on a flat stretch of road, do you? Then why do so when going uphill? Most triathlon coaches agree that the fastest bike split is achieved by dosing your effort as evenly as possible from T1 to T2, with no more than a 10 percent increase on uphill and upwind sections.

Gearing and cadence
“10 percent—that’s impossible!” you say? I’ve watched hundreds of triathletes struggle needlessly up hills of assorted lengths and pitches, and many do so with a few easier gears still available on their cassette, a sluggish cadence and a very high level of effort. Instead, use both front and rear shifters generously with the goal of maintaining a similar effort and cadence (85–95 RPM) as you transition from flat roads to climbing sections and back down, and your bike won’t even know the difference.

Choosing the right cassette
“But I’m in my granny gear as soon as the road tilts upward!” Sound familiar? Count the number of teeth on the largest cog on your cassette (the cluster of gears attached to your rear wheel). If you count 25 or less, then head right to your bike shop and ask them to replace your cassette with one with 28 or more teeth (a Shimano 105 11-28t runs about $60).

If you still run out of gears and your effort continues to go through the roof, then it’s time to back off on your cadence until your effort (power and heart rate) come down to within 10 percent of what they were on the flats. Further, you may start to doubt yourself as others blow by at near their max heart rate, but trust that you will indeed reel them back in and leave them in your dust when the course flattens out, and definitely when it comes time to run.

The standing climb
The biggest mistake triathletes make when they choose to stand for climbing sections is selecting too easy a gear. The resulting high cadence causes the heart rate to skyrocket with little, if any increase in speed. Instead, enjoy a change of position and some relief to your low back and rear end by standing and shifting to a slightly harder gear—one that allows you to pedal a cadence no greater than 50–60 RPM as you use body weight to help.

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Identifying overtraining syndrome http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/identifying-overtraining-syndrome http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/identifying-overtraining-syndrome#comments Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:20:10 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48102

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Far less straightforward than a torn tendon that shows up on an MRI, overtraining syndrome is a bit nebulous. It’s difficult to define ]]>

Photo: Nils Nilsen

Far less straightforward than a torn tendon that shows up on an MRI, overtraining syndrome is a bit nebulous. It’s difficult to define but obvious when it happens. Here are some of the most well-known symptoms:

Psychological
The psychological aspects of overtraining syndrome are typically related to athlete mental burnout. The athlete isn’t having fun, he treats every training session like work and he often dreads his races. Different than performance anxiety, these athletes are just exhausted—and look it.

The treatment for psychological burnout is tougher than the diagnosis. Often friends and training partners, or even spouses, can help dial back the intensity level and inject a dose of realism. In more serious cases, treatment may require the expert help of a mental health professional. The more serious cases tend to come from athletes who focus all their mental energy on triathlon as a means of escaping problems such as divorce or job stress. Health professionals can help make triathlon part of the solution, not the problem. I’d recommend finding someone who is an athlete as well—as a triathlete myself, I know that the worst advice is “stop training.”

Physical
The physical aspects of overtraining syndrome are easier to spot. These include both orthopedic and medical causes.

Orthopedic cases are generally classified as “high risk” overuse injuries. Examples include stress fractures around the hip and high-grade partial tears of tendons from repetitive use. These are different than garden-variety overuse injuries because they take huge amounts of stress and joint loading to occur. Athletes who suffer these types of injuries tend to disregard the body’s cues of pain and make painful injuries much worse. They push and push until injuries go from bad to terrible, often taking many months to heal.

Treatment of orthopedic-related overtraining syndrome includes both backing off the training volume and trying to figure out, with your doc, how to design a training program that is safer for your body.

Medical issues, meaning non-bone-related issues, are very common in overtraining syndrome. These include athletes who are always sick and tired, and just look unhealthy. Again, there are no specific parameters here. But things that I look for in my office include athletes who are sick for weeks on end, complain of exhaustion and drop large amounts of weight too quickly.

Treatment of medical-related overtraining syndrome involves both a reduction in training volume and consultation with a sports nutritionist who can help address the caloric imbalance. Your doc should also send off a series of blood tests to check for anemia, a common cause of fatigue particularly in female endurance athletes.

Overtraining syndrome can show itself differently in different athletes. The keys are to first recognize if you or a fellow athlete is suffering from it, and then to find a team of healthcare professionals who deal with athletes to help address the causes.

Jordan D. Metzl, M.D., is a nationally recognized sports medicine specialist at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Dr. Metzl is a 29-time marathon runner and nine-time Ironman finisher. His new book is titled The Athlete’s Book of Home Remedies. Drjordanmetzl.com

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Video: How to ride cyclocross http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/video-how-to-ride-cyclocross http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2014/10/23/video-how-to-ride-cyclocross#comments Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:10:39 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48105

Cyclocross is great fun and Tom and Simon love riding CX, so we thought we’d show Matt how to ride ‘cross and enter him into a ]]>

Cyclocross is great fun and Tom and Simon love riding CX, so we thought we’d show Matt how to ride ‘cross and enter him into a race!

To get Matt off to a flying start we ran through the changes that you need to make from your normal road riding position and bike set up to get him ready for cyclocross. This includes looking at bar and stem adjustments, tyre pressures and saddle height.

We also run through basic cyclocross technique to make sure that Matt will be able to keep his bike moving as fast as possible downhill, on the flat and whilst climbing.

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