Triathlete Europe http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com Europe's leading source for triathlon news and information. Wed, 25 May 2016 19:10:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.1 Technical FAQ: Tyre Widths, Pressures and more http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/technical-faq-tyre-widths-pressures-and-more http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/technical-faq-tyre-widths-pressures-and-more#comments Wed, 25 May 2016 14:00:58 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=45890

Wider tires, like the 27mm FMB Paris-Roubaix, can be used at lower pressures to increase ride comfort. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

  Question: 23mm vs. 25mm tyres Dear Lennard, I ride with a group of recreational road riders who do, on average, 100 kilometers per week.

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Wider tires, like the 27mm FMB Paris-Roubaix, can be used at lower pressures to increase ride comfort. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

Wider tyres, like the 27mm FMB Paris-Roubaix, can be used at lower pressures to increase ride comfort. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

 

Question: 23mm vs. 25mm tyres

Dear Lennard,
I ride with a group of recreational road riders who do, on average, 100 kilometers per week. Recently, most of the riders have switched from 23mm to 25mm tyres and like the ride better (whatever that means). As a theoretical question, if you had one 23mm and one 25mm, which would you put on the front and why?
— Doug

Dear Doug,
Well, I would put the bigger tyre on the rear. It gives you more cushioning, and that’s where you need it more. The bigger tire size also reduces rolling resistance, and that will make more difference on the tyre that is supporting more weight — the rear tyre.

The 25mm tyre also gives you more traction, assuming you’re running lower pressure in it than in the 23mm one. I suppose arguments about traction could be made for either the front or rear wheel.
― Lennard

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How To Choose The ‘Right’ Race http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/how-to-choose-the-right-race http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/how-to-choose-the-right-race#comments Wed, 25 May 2016 13:00:03 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=22548

Photo by Tom Shaw/Getty Images

It’s advantageous for all triathletes to choose events that are best suited to their strengths, but it’s particularly important for

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Photo by Tom Shaw/Getty Images

It’s advantageous for all triathletes to choose events that are best suited to their strengths, but it’s particularly important for time-crunched triathletes. Here’s why: When balancing your commitment to triathlon with a full-time job and a family, you need to squeeze out the greatest benefit from everything you do in training. If you don’t have an overabundance of base fitness (many of us simply don’t have an extra 12-plus hours per week to train), it pays to be more selective about the competitions you enter.

Here are some factors to consider when selecting the “right” race.

Season and Geography
Athletes who live and train at an elevation greater than 5,000 feet above sea level, often feel like Superman in races at lower elevations. In contrast, those living and training at sea level might not have their best performance at a high-altitude triathlon. Considering heat and humidity is also key. If you’re training in a dry environment, you’re more likely to suffer from heat-related issues if you travel to a hot and humid race without taking steps to acclimatize to the conditions you’ll be racing in. For time-crunched athletes, acclimatization activities, such as training in an artificially hot or humid environment, are often too time-consuming to be practical. You‘ll perform best in events held in conditions similar to where you train.

If you’re planning a destination race, consider the seasons to gain a competitive advantage. This works best for athletes who live and train in southern states where it’s warm in the winter and the triathlon season starts very early. If you travel, you can have some fun by taking peak mid-season fitness north to a race where most competitors still have early-season fitness.

Racing to your Strengths
You can also benefit from selecting local races based on your personal strengths as an athlete. Here are some guidelines related to each triathlon discipline to keep in mind when choosing the conditions that will best suit your strengths.

Swimming:
– If swimming is not your strong suit, choose a race you’re certain will be wetsuit-legal to help you achieve a faster swim time with a little less effort. Strong swimmers should seek a non-wetsuit swim to gain an edge on the competition.
– Strong swimmers should look for a swim that will have a current, such as in an ocean, bay or river, whereas weaker swimmers are best sticking to a lake or pool swims.

Cycling:
– If you’re a featherweight athlete and/or a good climber, pick a hilly race so you can benefit from your high power-to-weight ratio.
– If you are a heavier athlete and/or train on flatter terrain, pick a race that features flatter terrain, and you’ll also tend to cope with windy conditions better than lighter or smaller athletes.

Running:
– If you are lighter weight and/or stronger runner pick a race that has a challenging run course with more hills.
– A flat run course will be best for an individual that is heavier and/or has a weaker run.
– Running surface is a big factor as well. If you train a lot on trails or softer surfaces, or your legs and feet cannot tolerate the pounding of the pavement, then pick a race with a run course that features more dirt or gravel. In contrast, if you’re a fast road runner, then make sure you pick a race that will maximize the amount of time you spend on pavement during the run leg.

Patrick Valentine co-wrote this article and is an Expert Coach for Carmichael Training Systems and the 2010 US Off-Road Triathlon National Champion in the 20-24 age group. Chris Carmichael is the author of “The Time-Crunched Triathlete” and founder and CEO of Carmichael Training Systems, the official coaching and camps partner of Ironman. For information on coaching options and official Ironman Camps, visit Trainright.com.

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Swim Drafting: Getting It Right http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/swim-drafting-getting-it-right http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/swim-drafting-getting-it-right#comments Wed, 25 May 2016 12:00:15 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=50537

Photo: Thierry Sourbier/Endurapix

If you do it properly, swimming behind another athlete can save upward of 30 percent energy expenditure on race day… Truth: You are

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Photo: Thierry Sourbier/Endurapix

If you do it properly, swimming behind another athlete can save upward of 30 percent energy expenditure on race day…

Truth: You are wasting time and energy if you are not drafting in the swim leg of a triathlon. There are no rules against drafting another swimmer as long as you do not impede or obstruct their movement. How to make the most of the draft zone:

Get in position
The best and easiest place to draft in open water is directly behind the feet of another swimmer. This position does not cause any interference with the lead swimmer and allows the drafting swimmer to keep track of the leader by following a trail of bubbles. Every time you lift your head to sight the buoys and check your direction, you break neutral body position in the water and lose speed. Following the bubbles of another swimmer allows the drafter to sight less often and save more energy.

Follow etiquette
Proper etiquette advocates not touching or tapping the feet and legs of another swimmer when you are behind their feet. Unless you know the swimmer and this is a preset form of communication, try not to swim too close. The draft zone extends 3–5 seconds behind the lead swimmer (notice how you can still feel a draft when you push off the wall five seconds apart in swim practice). Leave 1–2 feet between your outstretched hand and their feet to stay in the draft zone but reduce the risk of constantly running into them.

Look for the right partner
Search for a swimmer traveling slightly faster than your pace—a brief surge to catch a draft is worth the energy as someone comes slowly past you. If Swimmer A races at 1:30 per 100 pace, but saves an estimated 20 percent by drafting, he should choose a slightly faster swimmer (someone who swims 1:20–1:25 pace) to follow. Therefore, Swimmer A will use the same amount of energy during the race but exit the water in a faster time.

Practice in the pool
Do long sets (for example: 3×400 or 1×1000) with drafting packs of 3–4 people swimming in a “train” or pace line. The first swimmer will lead for 100 yards and then stop on the wall while the rest of the group turns. As the final swimmer pushes off, the lead swimmer rejoins the group as the last swimmer. Continue this rotation, similar to a cycling pace line, for the remainder of the set. Make it more challenging by starting each interval with the entire group of swimmers pushing off the wall at the same time, sprinting the first lap, and then organising into a pace line during the second lap.

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TOWER 26:Be Race ready Podcast http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/tower-26be-race-ready-podcast-5 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/tower-26be-race-ready-podcast-5#comments Wed, 25 May 2016 11:00:01 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=56639

Episode #7: TECHNIQUE- What you NEED to know(Part 4) OVERSUBSCRIBED SWIM TEACHINGS- Early Vertical Forearm and Distance Per Stroke On this

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Episode #7: TECHNIQUE- What you NEED to know(Part 4) OVERSUBSCRIBED SWIM TEACHINGS- Early Vertical Forearm and Distance Per Stroke

On this episode Gerry and Jim continue the swim technique discussion by addressing common buzzwords heard often in swim education such as Early Vertical Forearm and distance per stroke.

Gerry and Jim explain through a history lesson that the Early Vertical Forearm has not made swimmers that much faster and that most triathletes do not have the flexibility to correctly execute the early vertical forearm. The Early Vertical Forearm is not the Holy Grail that triathlete think it is.

Distance Per Stroke is efficient but does not lend itself to high velocity. When focussing on distance per stroke there is a lot of deceleration during the stroke which is not beneficial to a fast swim split.

Through Gerry’s years of coaching swimmers of all ability levels he has developed different view points on the often talked about subjects.  Listen in to learn so you can be the best swimmer YOU can be.

After the main topic, the Workout of the Episode(#WOE) is given, athlete questions are answered, and the topic for the next episode is revealed.

You can Listen to the Podcast here: Episode #7:TECHNIQUE- What you NEED to know(Part 4) OVERSUBSCRIBED SWIM TEACHINGS- Early Vertical Forearm and Distance Per Stroke
Follow Triathlon Swimming with TOWER 26 on Twitter @Tower_26 for further tips on topics discussed on the show, to ask questions which will be answered On-Air, and to be part of the TOWER 26 triathlon swim community.

Gerry Rodrigues is the found of Tower 26 and an expert swim coach for Ironman University. He has coached over 150 pro athletes, thousands of amateurs and was US Masters Coach of the year in 1992. Gerry is the Co-founder of World Open Water Swimming Association, WOWSA, he launched the the first World Open Water Conference in Long Beach, CA and is a consultant to multiple NGB’s on swimming, open water swimming and triathlon programming.

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Change of Pace: The Benefits of Bike Racing http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/change-of-pace-the-benefits-of-bike-racing http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/change-of-pace-the-benefits-of-bike-racing#comments Wed, 25 May 2016 10:00:21 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=25507

Want to completely overhaul your cycling? Then bike racing may be the ticket. Partly in homage to the Tour de France, partly because

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Want to completely overhaul your cycling? Then bike racing may be the ticket. Partly in homage to the Tour de France, partly because it’s a good idea, former pro cyclist and coach Robbie Ventura turned some triathletes into cyclists for a season. When they came back to triathlon, they not only blew away their bike PBs, they ran faster with stronger cycling legs.

In addition to practicing cornering and drafting, you should learn three major skills: tactics, positioning and surging. Here’s how:

Test Race Tactics
Race tactics and energy conservation may be the toughest things to learn as a triathlete in bike racing. These are just as important as developing power and fitness—maybe more.

Start with some hard group rides, which can serve as a testing ground to practice your race tactics. (Note: Before you attack your local group or sit on the strongest guy like a barnacle, make sure they’re accepting of your antics.)

Experiment early on in your racing career, focusing on building experience versus results. Instead of sitting in the same position week after week, focus on specific tactics each race: Maybe one race you try to break away or maybe some races you conserve the entire race and attack with a couple of miles to go to try for the solo win. As you build your toolbox of tactics, you will start to understand the flow of racing and you may surprise yourself!

Don’t Be That Guy
Reality check: Roadies do not care that you have a 45- minute run after your group ride. Avoid common triathlete stereotypes by leaving your multisport plans—and these items—at home:

1. Aero helmet
2. Compression socks
3. Bento box
4. Tank top jerseys of any kind
5. Lingering race number on helmet

Nail Your Position
While tactics are learned with experience, one principle that does not change is where you position yourself in the pack. Being “near the front” but not “on the front” is the sweet spot. This will keep you safer, allow quicker reactions to attacks and limit stressful accelerations out of every turn.

The key to good positioning is getting there first. This might require a good start or crafty bike-handling skills, but for most, it simply takes a hard effort to get to the top 10. Once you’re there, maintaining that position also takes some effort, but as you learn the flow of the race, keeping it should take less and less energy. You will become smarter and smoother about surfing the “peloton rotation.” This is the way I describe maintaining position when everyone in the field wants to be in the front. You can “surf” on the outside of the peloton by constantly passing people as you start to feel pressure of being passed (the wave). This works best from the outside, so you can pass the riders in front of you as riders come up on your outside. It requires good pack awareness and a keen sense of people coming up from behind. If you can manage to concentrate the entire time, you can master this skill.

Master The Surge
In the bike leg of a triathlon, you determine how hard you want to go and keep accelerations to a minimum to save your legs for the run. For the most part, maintaining steady-state power over the course of the bike leg will maximize your speed over the given distance. In road racing, pace is determined by others—“your own pace” is not an option. You are constantly going over your limit to stay with the group and benefit from its massive draft. Unlike triathlon, you must surge to survive a bike race.

High-intensity surges do huge damage to the muscles and anaerobic energy systems, so it takes training to get used to these efforts. These are the same intervals I believe triathletes should be doing anyway—if you’re bike racing, you do them more frequently and during the specificity period of your training. I am a big believer that triathletes need to build overall range of power, regardless of the race distance they’re focused on.

Train To Race
Short intervals
To start, do hard (close to all-out) 60- to 120-second intervals with complete rest, which is necessary to hit the highs needed to improve. Once you get stronger, and as you get closer to the event, you can decrease the rest time and/or increase the intensity of the rest to make it more race-specific. Start with no more than 15–20 minutes of total interval time.

Group rides
Hard group rides will force you to surge significantly more than training on your own. The group will also be a bit less predictable, forcing you to go hard at random times, thus changing up the interval duration and recovery parameters.

Bike Racing 101
Where do I start?
You need a road bike. They are stiffer, lighter and more comfortable in an upright position. Plus, tri bikes are illegal in road races anyway.

What should I know before signing up for my first race?
Make sure you are competent and comfortable on your local group rides. The competency comes not only from the necessary endurance and power, but bike skills and pack etiquette as well. Drafting, cornering and situational awareness are all very important to being a safe and effective bike racer. Make smooth movements rather than quick ones and hold a constant line through a turn rather then sweeping through the width of the road as you can in a triathlon.

What are the best events for first-timers?
A time trial is an easy one, but that’s more like a triathlon than a bike race. Start with safe road races on courses that are less technical.

How do I “learn” to race?
Watch how an experienced rider navigates the peloton, the lines he takes, how he spends his energy and how he sets up for attacks or the finish.

Robbie Ventura is a former pro cyclist who spent four years on the U.S. Postal Service team. Nowadays, he and his world-class team provide training expertise for more than 300 endurance athletes through Vision Quest Coaching.

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One-Hour Workout: Time-Based Swim Set http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/one-hour-workout-time-based-swim-set http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/25/one-hour-workout-time-based-swim-set#comments Wed, 25 May 2016 09:00:20 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=56635

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Wednesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!). Take a mental break from counting

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Every Wednesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

Take a mental break from counting yards and focus on swimming for time in today’s one-hour swim set, inspired by Coach Dave Sheanin of D3 Multisport in Boulder, Colo.

Warm-up
10 min easy choice

3×2 min with 15-20 sec recovery
Alternate doing a drill on the way down and swim on the way back. Focus on your stroke weaknesses with drills such as one arm only, catch-up drill or fist drill.

Main Set
5×5 min swim with consistent pacing, 30 sec recovery.
Check your splits on each 100 to ensure you’re staying steady throughout, and keep track of how many yards you cover each 5 minutes.

5, 4, 3, 2, 1 min swim with 30 sec recovery, increasing your effort as you descend in time

Cool-down
5–10 min

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Quick fit guide: the triathlon wetsuit http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/quick-fit-guide-the-triathlon-wetsuit http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/quick-fit-guide-the-triathlon-wetsuit#comments Tue, 24 May 2016 14:00:45 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=48184

If you’re new to wearing a wetsuit, you’ll be pleasantly surprised—the thick layer of neoprene acts as a full-body buoy in the water.

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If you’re new to wearing a wetsuit, you’ll be pleasantly surprised—the thick layer of neoprene acts as a full-body buoy in the water. There is no shortage of wetsuit options, with manufacturers now designing and marketing to different levels of swimmers as well as varying body types and comfort preferences.

Fit is by far the most important aspect of choosing a wetsuit. Don’t be shy about trying on multiple suits, taking advantage of demo swims, and studying the size charts and customer reviews. The right suit is not the most expensive one you can afford—even a $1,000 wetsuit will not help you swim faster if it makes you feel uncomfortable and restricted. Although it’s one of the pricier triathlon gear purchases you’ll make, with proper care, the right suit can last multiple race seasons.

Put on your wetsuit in 3 steps
Step 1

Start by sliding on the legs and pulling the crotch of the suit as high as possible. Many people use a plastic bag on their feet and hands to make the “sliding” part smoother.

Step 2
Put on the sleeves and draw the excess material up to your shoulders so you have full range of movement.

Step 3
Finally, do not over-tighten when cinching the rear neck strap. What feels comfortable on dry land is very different from what feels comfortable while you are breathing hard in the middle of a long swim.

How should it fit?
The perfect suit will be snug but not constricting. A suit that is too small will pull down on your shoulders, while one that is too big will hang loose between your legs.

A small amount of water should get inside your suit while you swim; it is necessary for the suit to do its job. The wetsuit is designed to hold a small layer of water against your skin. Your body warms up this water and the suit keeps it from escaping. A suit that is too big will let water flow in and out, preventing you from staying warm in cold swims.

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Why Going Too Fast May Make You A Slower Runner http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/why-going-too-fast-may-make-you-slower http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/why-going-too-fast-may-make-you-slower#comments Tue, 24 May 2016 13:00:51 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=14465 We all like to push ourselves, but is it possible to push ourselves too hard? Yes, in a word. And if you are following a prescribed

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We all like to push ourselves, but is it possible to push ourselves too hard? Yes, in a word. And if you are following a prescribed training plan, going too far or too fast can have a detrimental impact on your race day performance.

RunnerWritten by: Jeff Gaudette
Breaking the speed limit in a car is illegal, and if I had it my way as a coach, it would be illegal in running workouts, too. In a runner’s mind faster is always better, and any run that is longer or harder than prescribed is considered an achievement. However, if you’re following a well-written training plan, running faster or longer than prescribed might actually be detrimental to your potential at your goal race and your long-term progression.

Each workout, recovery run, and rest day in a well thought out training plan has a specific purpose. To maximize the effectiveness of each run and to make the absolute most out of every mile, it’s important that an athlete adheres to pace guidelines in a customized plan.

Over the following pages let’s take a look at a few common running workouts and why breaking the speed limit is a bad idea.

Tempo Runs
A tempo run is designed to improve a runner’s lactate threshold. During easy running, your body breaks down sugars to fuel the muscles, which produces lactic acid. When running easy, the body recycles lactic acid back into energy and efficiently expels the waste products. As you continue to run faster and demand more energy, the production of lactic acid will slowly increase. The point at which your body produces more lactic acid than it is able to reconvert back into energy is referred to as your lactate threshold. A tempo run requires running slightly slower than the body’s lactate threshold, so that you train your body to increase its ability to reconvert lactate back into energy. Tempo runs extend endurance and the ability to maintain a faster pace over longer races like the 10Kand the half marathon.

Why running faster during a tempo run is detrimental:
When you push too far beyond your lactate threshold pace, you prevent your body from learning how to effectively clear lactate. Instead of becoming more efficient by handling a moderate and consistent amount of lactate, your body is flooded. It isn’t able to benefit from a prolonged period of lactate clearance. By speeding up, you don’t achieve the benefits of the workout and actually walk away from your tempo run less fit than you would have by staying on the prescribed pace.

Recovery Runs
After a hard workout, a runner’s muscles will have micro-tears from the forceful contractions which happen at fast speeds. These micro-tears cause muscle soreness, and make training the day after a hard workout difficult. The body heals these small micro-tears through the circulatory system, which delivers the oxygen and nutrients to the muscles that need repair. An easy recovery run increases blood flow to the muscles specific to running, helping to clear out waste products and deliver fresh oxygen and nutrients.


Why running recovery runs too fast is detrimental
:
Your body does not have an infinite ability to heal itself and requires proper rest in between hard bouts. If you run too hard on an easy day, you create more muscle tears than you’re fixing, extending the amount of time you need to fully recover. This can cause you to run poorly on subsequent workouts because your muscles are still fatigued. Keeping your easy days truly easy will promote faster recovery, allowing you to be prepared for the next hard session and produce maximum results.

Speed Workouts
Defined simply, VO2 max is the maximum amount of oxygen the body can utilize during exercise. Training at VO2 max increases this limit, allowing you to have a quicker leg turnover and improve your top speed. In addition, speed workouts increase leg muscle strength and power, which reduces how much energy it takes to run at a certain speed, also known as improving your “economy.”

Why running speed workouts too fast is detrimental:
During VO2 max workouts and speed work, you’re asking your body to push its limits. When running near your top speed, the likelihood of injury is increased since muscles are being contracted to their max while under duress. Your training schedule will assign workouts that hit your VO2 max to develop speed, but keep you from going over the red line. Keeping your speed workouts within the given pace range will reduce the risk of injury and allow you to string together consistent training.

A well-written training plan is an intricate puzzle that pieces together different types of workouts. It maximizes the available time to prepare an athlete to have his or her best performance on race day. Running faster than prescribed paces may seem as if it’s advancing your fitness, but you are actually limiting your progress and increasing the likelihood of getting injured. Before you step out the door on your next run, think to yourself, “What is the purpose of my run today?” This will ensure you stay on course and give you the confidence you need to execute a plan as it’s prescribed, even if it means obeying the speed limit.

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Credit Suisse wins the first ‘Pop-up’ city triathlon at Canary Wharf yesterday http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/credit-suisse-wins-the-first-pop-up-city-triathlon-at-canary-wharf-yesterday http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/credit-suisse-wins-the-first-pop-up-city-triathlon-at-canary-wharf-yesterday#comments Tue, 24 May 2016 12:30:30 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=56632

Nearly 100 city workers, 28 teams, sweated it out as they competed against banking rivals in Montgomery Square, Canary Wharf in a staged

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Nearly 100 city workers, 28 teams, sweated it out as they competed against banking rivals in Montgomery Square, Canary Wharf in a staged event, organised by Castle Triathlon Series in partnership with Speedo and KPMG, yesterday (Monday 23rd May 2016). Credit Suisse took the winning slot on the competitive leaderboard covering an impressive distance of 4,640 metres (172 metre lead) as their team swam for 3 minutes in an endless pool, biked for 4 minutes on a cycle ergometer and ran for 4 minutes on a treadmill. See the full scoreboard here.

There was an impressive selection of teams including KPMG, Barclays, Santander, HSBC, Credit Suisse, Citi Bank, Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, NSPCC, Canary Wharf, Clifford Chance and many more. The teams were made up of three individuals, competing in one discipline each and representing the same company.

Credit Suisse will receive a winning trophy, £1,000 charity gift, courtesy of Speedo, of which they will donate to national children’s charity NSPCC, each team member will get a dryrobe and KitBrix bag and have the opportunity to train with professional triathletes, Team BMC.

Fast facts about the day:

  • Six swimmers hit 240m with 3 minutes in the endless swimming pool
  • Rory Townsend, on behalf of Kelsey Media, had the winning distance on the bike covering with 3.7km
  • Five runners reached 1km on the 3 minute treadmill run
  • The endless pool was filled with 10 tonnes of water

Race Director, Brian Adcock comments: “The event was hailed a huge success from all those taking part, spectators and partners. We successfully transported triathlon to the door-step of the corporates offices and celebrated the sport. We would like to see the Pop-Up City triathlon concept extend in 2017 with a roadshow of activity.”

The Castle Triathlon Series offer the opportunity for companies to have their own bespoke wave at their six-triathlon festivals hosted at iconic castles and stunning grounds. They also offer a hospitality tent with delectable food and drink for company members for both pre- and post-race refreshment. Key companies who have embraced the series since its formation are Morgan Stanley, Reckitt Benkiser and KPMG, who sent employees to the Series in 2015. Read more.

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The Three Best Core Exercises For Runners http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/the-three-best-core-exercises-for-running http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/05/24/the-three-best-core-exercises-for-running#comments Tue, 24 May 2016 12:00:20 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=33323

There are lots of core exercises out there. Doing any of them is better than doing none of them. But some are definitely better for runners

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There are lots of core exercises out there. Doing any of them is better than doing none of them. But some are definitely better for runners than others.

A strong core — that is, strong abdominal and low-back muscles — enhances running performance and may reduce injury risk. The best core exercises for runners are those that mimic the specific ways the core muscles are required to work during running. Here are three moves that do just that.

Supine March
Why it’s good for runners: Core stability begins with the transverse abdominis, a deep abdominal muscle that needs to hold the right amount of tension to prevent excessive movement of the pelvis and lumbar spine during running. The greatest challenge this muscle faces in running is maintaining appropriate tension while the legs move freely and alternately. The Supine March is a great exercise for runners because it administers that very challenge in a controlled way.

How to do it: Lie face up in the floor with both knees sharply bent and your feet flat on the floor. Press your low back into the floor. While concentrating on keeping your low back pressed into the floor, lift your left leg until your left foot comes even with your right knee. Now lower the foot back to the floor. Repeat with the right leg. Continue until you begin to feel an uncomfortable burn in your tummy, up to 20 reps per leg.

Standing Trunk Rotation with Cable
Why it’s good for runners: One of the important jobs of the core muscles during running is to control rotational forces. Among the biggest energy wasters in running is excessive rotation of the hips, pelvis, and/or spine. The Standing Rotation with Cable isolates and intensifies this particular challenge.

How to do it: Stand with your left side facing a cable pulley station with a handle attached at shoulder height. Grasp the handle with both hands and both arms fully extended. Begin with your torso rotated toward the handle and tension in the cable (i.e. the weight stack is slightly elevated from the resting position). Rotate your torso to the right while keeping your arms fully extended and the handle in line with the center of your chest. Keep your eyes focused on the handle as you rotate and your hips locked forward. Return to the start position without allowing the weight stack to come to rest. Complete 12 repetitions, then reverse your position and repeat the exercise.

Suitcase Deadlift
Why it’s good for runners: Running is all about moving against gravity in an upright position. Most core exercises don’t mimic this fundamental element of running. The Suitcase Deadlift does. In particular, it trains the oblique muscles on the sides of the torso to do what they are asked to do during running, which is to keep the torso vertically in line with the legs against resistance. The low back muscles are also challenged in a running-specific way in this exercise.

How to do it: Stand with your arms hanging at your sides and a dumbbell in one hand. Push your hips back, bend the knees, and reach the dumbbell down as close to the floor as you can without rounding your lower back. Now stand up again. Don’t allow your torso to tilt to either side while performing this movement. Complete 10 repetitions, rest for 30 seconds, then repeat the exercise while holding the dumbbell in the opposite hand.

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