Triathlete Europe http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com Europe's leading source for triathlon news and information. Fri, 30 Jan 2015 13:30:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 60 minute session: Treadmill hill climbs http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/60-minute-session-treadmill-hill-climbs http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/60-minute-session-treadmill-hill-climbs#comments Fri, 30 Jan 2015 13:30:30 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49227

Photo: Shutterstock

Every Friday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!). The treadmill doesn’t have to be ]]>

Photo: Shutterstock

Every Friday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!). The treadmill doesn’t have to be synonymous with the dreadmill, especially when icy roads, heavy snow and extreme cold threaten to wreak havoc on your winter training. It can be a valuable training tool when the harsh realities of winter threaten to compromise the quality of your key workouts.

Inserting a little variety into your treadmill workouts not only helps break up the boredom of running in place, it will also catapult you into kick-ass shape when running outside isn’t an advisable option.

“My advice is to vary the incline and speed on your treadmill runs,” coach Greg McMillan wrote for Competitor.com. “Don’t just set the pace and leave it. Run up some hills—some small and some large. Visualize your outdoor routes and mimic their terrain on the treadmill. And adjust your pace from time to time.”

Three-time Mount Washington Road Race winner Eric Blake does many hill workouts on the treadmill to simulate the demanding inclines of the 7.6-mile all-uphill route. You don’t have to go quite as steep as the 10-12 percent grades he tries to replicate, but hitting some long hill repeats on the treadmill over the winter will keep you from getting bored and help build a solid foundation of strength to power you through your spring speed workouts.

Hill Climbs
Warm-up

1-3 miles of easy running, followed by 6 x 20-second strides

Main Set
Increase the incline on your treadmill to a 6-8 percent grade and perform 6-8 half-mile “climbs” at your 10K race pace with 3-4 minutes of easy, flat running between reps.

Cool-down
1-3 miles of easy running

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Get serious about your race weight http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/get-serious-about-your-race-weight http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/get-serious-about-your-race-weight#comments Fri, 30 Jan 2015 12:30:26 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49224

We talk about weight loss a lot in our culture. And when we talk about weight loss, we almost always talk about what kinds of food and how ]]>

We talk about weight loss a lot in our culture. And when we talk about weight loss, we almost always talk about what kinds of food and how much food we should eat to lose weight. Secondarily, we talk about how much and what types of exercise we should do. It seems obvious to do so.

Funny thing is, these matters are somewhat beside the point. In the real world, people lose weight on many different kinds of diets and on many different types of exercise programs. The one thing that all serious weight losers do is modify their behavior. Essentially, this means they make a serious commitment to losing weight, one way or another. So if you want to lose weight, think less about discovering the single right way to eat and/or exercise to lose weight, because it doesn’t exist. Instead, think about making a serious commitment to weight loss.

You’ve probably heard of the National Weight Control Registry. It’s basically a national database of men and women who have succeeded in losing at least 30 pounds and maintaining at least 30 pounds of weight loss for at least one year. Whatever these people do, works. It’s not theory, but practice. And what do members of the NWCR do?

For starters, their diets are all over the place. Some are on low-fat diets, others are on low-carb diets, still others do Weight Watchers, yet others are vegetarians, and so forth. Another interesting characteristic of NWCR members is that the vast majority of them failed with weight-loss diets a few times before finally succeeding. The combination of these two characteristics—variety in successful diet approaches and failures preceding success—suggests that different ways of losing weight work best for different people. A certain amount of trial and error is required to find a system that’s a good match for one’s individual needs, preferences, personality, and lifestyle.

So if the diet itself doesn’t matter, what does? After exercise, the behavior that is most powerfully associated with successful weight-loss maintenance among NWCR members is self-monitoring. Most NWCR members count calories or at least track their food intake. This can be done informally, as in aiming for a quota of five fruit and vegetable servings daily or limiting oneself to one sweet per day. But, one way or another, these folks are paying attention to, and quantifying, their intake. And almost all of them are weighing themselves at least once a week and as often as daily.

The interesting thing about self-monitoring is that it’s just observing. There is nothing inherent to self-monitoring that causes weight loss. Yet it is more closely associated with successful weight loss than any dietary prescription for weight loss. Why? Because it symbolizes a commitment to losing weight. You simply aren’t going to make the effort to count the number of calories you eat and to weigh yourself every day unless you’re serious about losing weight. The specifics of eating and exercising for weight loss will almost automatically follow from this serious attitude.

Have you ever bumped into an old friend or acquaintance out in public, caught up briefly, and then discussed the need to meet for lunch and catch up more thoroughly? One of two things always happens. If you and your friend are serious about reactivating the friendship, you will make a lunch date right then and there. You will pick a specific restaurant and a specific time to meet there. If you’re not serious, you will part by saying, “We should meet for lunch! Call me!”

That call will never be made. It’s not that you wouldn’t like to have lunch with your friend. It’s just not important enough for you to overcome the inertia of your normal routine.

Losing weight is like that. It’s not about whether or not you really want to lose weight. Everyone who needs to lose weight really wants to lose weight. It’s about whether you’re serious about losing weight. If you are serious, you will lose weight. It’s as simple as that. You will try and fail with different approaches until you find one that works for you, and once you do, you will pay close attention to what you eat and how much you weigh for the rest of your life. Exactly what you eat is completely up to you.

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Cycle insurance – do you need it? http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/cycle-insurance-do-you-need-it http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/cycle-insurance-do-you-need-it#comments Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:30:40 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49222

Tom Briggs joined Cervélo as their in-house graphic designer earlier this spring and his first assignment was to create a custom paint scheme for the defending Ironman world champ, Frederik Van Lierde. It was also the first custom bike frame paint job the talent artist ever undertook. The outcome is this spectacular pixelated green-and-black, truly novel design.

If you own a bike or two, the value is over £1000 and you train with others, then the answer is likely to be yes. Add in racing, ]]>

Tom Briggs joined Cervélo as their in-house graphic designer earlier this spring and his first assignment was to create a custom paint scheme for the defending Ironman world champ, Frederik Van Lierde. It was also the first custom bike frame paint job the talent artist ever undertook. The outcome is this spectacular pixelated green-and-black, truly novel design.

If you own a bike or two, the value is over £1000 and you train with others, then the answer is likely to be yes. Add in racing, travelling with your bike and a few gadgets and the answer starts to get a little clearer.

There are many specific cycle insurance companies currently vying for your business, as an ambassador for bikmoplus.com I am very aware of the need to get the best cover for your bikes and kit.

When training for and racing in triathlons I certainly have more interesting areas to keep myself occupied, let’s face it, bike insurance is boring, the question is, do I need it?

Triathlon can be an expensive pastime, I would be devastated if my race bike or training bike were to fall into the hands of thieves or I had an accident while out riding that required hundreds or thousands of pounds to fix. To give me peace of mind I cover my bikes with insurance separately from my home and have done for most of the last 10 years.

If I am honest, it invariably comes down to money, the next gadget normally gets the first look in, unfortunately when you’ve been around the sport for as long as I have there tends to be a wiser choice that has to take priority.

Cycling and multisport, specifically triathlon, is still in a boom phase, since the Olympics nearly 3 years ago the growth in cycling has meant nearly 200,000 more people have taken to the road in one form or another on 2 wheels. There is also the aspect of fitness, green issues and the very popular cycle to work schemes. Unfortunately this also brings the darker side of society, thefts of cycles in 2014 were around the half a million mark, that’s a lot of hard earned money, gone.

So, what about bike insurance?
Firstly, you need to work out if the value of your bike warrants a specific policy, most will be covered for loss under your home insurance if below a certain value, say £1000.

Protecting your kit in the home/garage/shed is of a major concern when looking at bike insurance and there are plenty of guides on how to do this. BikmoPlus have put together a useful guide to home security which includes all of those locations.

Theft doesn’t always happen when you are at home, I have been witness to one particular attempt to steal a bike leant against 3 others outside a café when we have stopped for coffee, we were only on the other side of the window, the brass neck on these guys is a crazy thing to behold ! I’ve also heard of cycles being snatched and gangs using mopeds to assist their escape, it’s gone in a flash! This is just while out riding.

So how do you ensure you get the best for your bikes?
There is definitely a debate around home insurance v’s cycle insurance, with the majority of bike specific policies only really coming into their own over a certain amount, there are a number of things to consider when choosing cycle insurance over standard home policy.

Maximum Cycle Value – home contents will have a limit and over this will add to your premium

Cover away from your home – are you covered for theft away from the home or abroad.

Competition Cover – your home policy will probably exclude event participation or even the possibility of being stolen from transition.

Will a claim for my bike affect my house premiums – Linking your cycles to your house premium could have the effect of pushing up your policy come renewal.

As a competitive triathlete I also have to consider the cover while at an event or getting to an event. I need cover while travelling, training and racing. Remember the spate of thefts from transitions a few years ago? Travelling has its own pitfalls, international cover? Many races attracting the UK triathletes are in Europe and further afield.

The worst feeling is yet to come ….. What if I get to the race I have been training 9 months for and my bike doesn’t arrive, a number of cycle policies will cover you to rent a bike, and then when you get home, if you still don’t have your bike back, a replacement shouldn’t be far behind. Great cover not seen on the standard home insurance.

Covered for this?
So why do people have a hard time rationalising the outlay of protecting their bikes? Car insurance is compulsory so it’s not a good comparison, however, the cost of replacing a full TT race set up can in some cases compare to the cost of a small car!

What can the specialists like bikmoplus.com provide that we don’t get as standard on home insurance. A number have started to work with specific sports like cycling and triathlon to cover the danger areas and target our day to day use of the bike and not just to cover for theft from the home.

– Multi bike cover, most triathletes have more than one bike, but you can only ride one at once.
– Cover while competing, before during and after.
– Cover for accessories and gadgets up to set value as part of policy.
– New for old policy.
– Some don’t have an excess to pay over a certain claim figure.
– Interest free monthly payments – very frustrating getting a quote and finding out they ask for a premium to pay monthly.

What about my conditions of insurance?
Like most insurance policies in today’s market there are likely to be certain conditions you need to know about. No different to insuring your car and making sure you take every precaution to prevent its loss. Bikes will need to be locked when not used, the standard of lock will be recommended and based on the value. The majority of specialist policies will insist on Gold Standard locks and proof that you have taken every reasonable step to prevent the theft. If you are unsure, check beforehand and then check out Sold Secure for options.

Lastly, for most of the leisure cycling population this won’t be a concern but for group riding and the more competitive, personal liability and personal accident while out riding won’t be covered by a home insurance policy as standard, having a specific bike policy adds peace of mind that if something went wrong you have the correct cover. 

If you are serious about your bikes, you should be serious about protecting them, check out the benefits, it could be the best triathlete product you buy this year.

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Interview: Jodie Swallow’s winning ways http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/interview-jodie-swallows-winning-ways http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/30/interview-jodie-swallows-winning-ways#comments Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:00:39 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49230

Hot on the heels of Jodie Swallow’s record-breaking fifth-straight victory at Ironman 70.3 South Africa, I had a chance to chat with the ]]>

Hot on the heels of Jodie Swallow’s record-breaking fifth-straight victory at Ironman 70.3 South Africa, I had a chance to chat with the world champion athlete as to the formula for her success and her plans for the 2015 season.

Huge congratulations on your victory in South Africa! Winning any race five times is impressive, but doing so five times consecutively is an even greater accomplishment, not to mention a rarity. What do you think has contributed to your consistent top performances at this race in particular?
Thank you. These days each race is contended well so yes, five times in a row is special. Even the fact I haven’t been (too) injured or ill for five years is surprising! The thing with this race is that it is early on in the year and so suits an athlete like me who is only ever 20 percent away from full fitness for most of the year and that it is so hot, windy, hilly and torrid. I get on with my race and try to work with the conditions that are given. I have confidence I am at least excellent at enduring and this race sometimes can feel like a war of attrition. It is a great exercise to toughen me up for the year.

You truly are consistent across the board–in terms of reaching the podium time and again in the big races, and also in terms of being a force to fear in all three triathlon disciplines. What do you feel are the keys to your ability to excel all-around in swim, bike and run?
In truth I always put it down to training. I am very good at enduring, as I said before. Training is the best part of my day and my main focus and once you enjoy something that is productive there is no looking back really. I also employ the best coach in the world–Siri Lindley–and that is totally something to do with it. We train hard and specifically at all three disciplines. I see no reason why I could not be an elite swimmer, or runner or a cyclist if I absolutely focused on that. You have to be that good these days and I think that putting no limits on my ambition and ability helps me approach training properly. The other thing is my health. I eat properly–healthily and balanced all the time so I can keep multiple sessions in my day and perform well despite what I have already done.

You were on the podium at almost every major race last year. What’s on your 2015 schedule?
I like racing the best and am in the privileged situation of Kona points for 2015. I can therefore select races based on prize money and coverage and specific professional lady provisions (separate waves, enough gap between us and the age groupers, sport development for professionals). These are priorities for me. My schedule includes the Challenge Triple Crown (Dubai, Oman and Bahrain), Ironman South Africa, Ironman and Ironman 70.3 World Champs plus another full distance in the summer depending on circumstances.

Obviously anything can happen on any day in this sport, and you can only control certain factors–such as your own preparation. Looking ahead to Kona, where you’ve come within reach of the win, what do you think it will take to earn that top spot? Is there something specific you feel you need to focus on more so than you have in the past?
No, Siri and I are exceptionally happy with 2014. We won’t change too much as we are moving forward each week. As you say I am in reach of the highest rank and will work with time and circumstance to do all I can to win it.

In your time working with Siri, what’s the biggest thing you’ve learned from her thus far?
She is very special. She reminds me to value myself–outside of racing. That is weird as she is my sports coach, but then I am weird, so we fit. Siri would value me just as much if I decided to quit triathlon. She judges people on their soul, not their prowess.

As we head into a new season, considering all the triathlon politics that were in the spotlight last year, what are one or two changes you would like to see as the sport moves forward?
I would like to see a compulsory gap for race organizers of Full Continental Championship standard races from pro women to age group men of 25 minutes (Frankfurt, Roth, Texas, South Africa, Brazil, Kona) as a reflection of equality of provision and fair racing for women in elite fields. Racing is only inspirational if it is fair–drug-free, draft-free and respected.

I would like to see better coverage of big races prioritized by race organizers, initially on the internet, which I believe would prompt further media interest in our professional sport and a better experience for fans and spectators. We have an excellent product and the coverage of Challenge Bahrain should be the standard. The excitement and feedback that surrounded that inaugural event was second to none. I want to increase the professionality of professional triathlon.

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The art of progressive training http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/the-art-of-progressive-training http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/the-art-of-progressive-training#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:30:26 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49217

Photo: Shutterstock

Progressive training, or gradually improving fitness over the course of many weeks in preparation for a key race, can be a difficult ]]>

Photo: Shutterstock

Progressive training, or gradually improving fitness over the course of many weeks in preparation for a key race, can be a difficult concept for many runners to embrace. All too often, the desired end result becomes the sole focus of the endeavor and runners fail to take into account the necessary steps along the way as well as the challenges and obstacles that may arise over the course of a training cycle.

When I write training schedules, I rarely write more than three or four weeks at a time. Primarily, this is because training almost never goes as planned and it doesn’t make sense to plan for what will certainly change. However, on the occasion that I do need to write a schedule more than a few weeks in advance, I inevitably run into the same problem – athletes get intimidated.

When runners examine a training schedule, their eyes inevitably find their way to the last six to eight weeks of training. They see the big workouts, increasing mileage, and tough long runs and hit the panic button. Oftentimes, I get an email that sounds something like this:

“Coach, you’re crazy! I can’t run x miles at y pace – I can barely do that for 3 miles now. Maybe you sent me the wrong schedule.”

I understand the fear these runners face. When you only consider the end result, sometimes you can be too intimidated to start.

Your takeaway: Don’t worry about the workouts, mileage, and long runs in your training schedule that aren’t in the immediate future. Focus on one workout and one week at a time. Each week, you’ll get a little stronger and a little faster and when those intimidating workouts arrive, you’ll be ready to tackle them with confidence.

Results Don’t Happen Every Day
Once new runners get over the feeling that running sucks because it always hurts, training becomes less of a chore, and positive race results help to reinforce that enjoyment. As your weekly mileage rises, workouts become faster and personal bests start dropping seemingly every time you race, running becomes more enjoyable because you’re seeing regular, marked improvement.

Then, almost out of nowhere, hitting personal bests starts to get increasingly more difficult. You’re working harder than you ever have in training, but not seeing the results you expect.

Your takeaway: Don’t measure your progress in daily, weekly, or even monthly blocks. Training adaptations don’t happen that quickly once you’re already fit. Instead, reflect on how far you’ve come in the past year or the past six to eight months. Look back a year and compare your workout paces, long run distances, and weekly mileage to look for signs of progress.

There’s No Skipping Steps
In today’s culture, we’ve been conditioned to want and expect things instantly, and running is no different. In training, we all want to run more miles, run workouts faster, qualify for Boston, set a personal best — and we want to do it now! That mentality, however, and the type of desperate training it fosters, inevitably leads to injury and overtraining.

As runners, we have to start at the beginning, take small steps and gradually progress our training toward future goals. And, of course, we must be willing to take steps back sometimes and adjust if unforeseen obstacles such as injury or illness get in our way.

Your takeaway: You have to start from the beginning, even if the beginning seems so far away from your ultimate goal. For example, if you’re constantly injured, take a step back, start from the beginning, build you aerobic base slowly and let your muscles, tendons and ligaments adapt to the mileage. Likewise, don’t try to skip steps or take shortcuts. If you have a race coming up and you’re not ready, don’t force training you’re not ready to handle. Always take the next logical step in your training. If you do so, you’re guaranteed to reach your goal.

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How to deal with a DNS http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/how-to-deal-with-a-dns http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/how-to-deal-with-a-dns#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:30:46 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49214

With the months of preparation you put into preparing for your A race, getting injured or sick at the last second can be devastating. The ]]>

With the months of preparation you put into preparing for your A race, getting injured or sick at the last second can be devastating. The decision to drop out before things get worse is not an easy one, considering the time and money invested.

First and foremost, give yourself time. It can be tempting to make a quick decision: to push through an injury, to sign up for a “redemption” race or to change direction. Wait a while before making any major decisions.

After some time passes (I recommend at least two weeks), you will gain perspective on the true cause of your DNS. Learn from the experience so you can adjust your approach. Even seemingly random events, like bike crashes, can stem from a deeper root cause of pushing ourselves too hard.

The next step is to focus on recovery. Whether you were derailed by a crash, an illness or simply lack of preparation time, the answer is not additional stress. Use the planned setback of the DNS as the start point for a deep “unloading” block of at least four weeks’ duration. Stay active but resist the urge to do any real training. If you are recovering from an injury, create space in your work and family life. Once you have your health back, focusing on a non-triathlon project can be an excellent way to channel your energy.

If you were derailed due to a stress fracture, consult with a sports doctor who can help you evaluate your approach to nutrition. These injuries are often signals related to your relationship with food.

The first few days after a setback are never much fun. For a couple of days, give yourself some time each morning to recognize your emotions. Then, set a fresh goal and start the journey anew.

Gordo Byrn is the founder of Endurancecorner.com, the co-author of Going Long and a past champion of Ultraman Hawaii.

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Is pronation to blame for run injuries? http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/is-pronation-to-blame-for-run-injuries http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/is-pronation-to-blame-for-run-injuries#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:30:35 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49219

For years, pronation has been a common scapegoat when it comes to identifying the cause of running injuries. Physicians, coaches and ]]>

For years, pronation has been a common scapegoat when it comes to identifying the cause of running injuries. Physicians, coaches and running store employees long pointed to the inward rolling of the feet as the likely catalyst for everything from shin splints to runner’s knee. New research from Aarhus University in Denmark, however, contradicts the belief that moderate foot pronation may be linked to running injuries.

Upon recruiting 927 novice runners and categorizing their foot type—that is, the degree to which they did or didn’t pronate—researchers started athletes out on a running program. The participants completed their miles in neutral shoes, which lack any mechanisms of controlling the way the foot hits the ground. Interestingly at the end of the study, they found no significant link between foot type and risk of injuries, suggesting that in many cases, training errors are to blame.

“We like to say that much of the time, the problem is not the shoe, rather the problem is the thing in the shoe,” says Shawn Allen, an Illinois-based chiropractor and co-founder of The Gait Guys. Indeed, while an improper shoe can cause issues, more often than not, an injury is the result of something else gone awry.

To help further elucidate the root causes of running injuries, Allen and his partner Ivo Waerlop have coined the mnemonic device “S.E.S.,” which stands for “skill, endurance, strength.” “S.E.S. is the reason for most running injuries,” Allen says. “Footwear and foot strike are issues, but looking at the athlete’s S.E.S. is critically important.”

To find the root cause of your injury or to prevent one in the first place, consider seeing a specialist—physical therapist, chiropractor, sports medicine doctor—who can assess the S.E.S. of your gait.

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Belinda Granger joins the Challenge Family team http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/belinda-granger-joins-the-challenge-family-team http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/29/belinda-granger-joins-the-challenge-family-team#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 09:00:28 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49211

Photo by Matt Roberts/Getty Images

As the Challenge Family portfolio of long distance triathlons continues to expand, the team delivering these world-class events increases. ]]>

Photo by Matt Roberts/Getty Images

As the Challenge Family portfolio of long distance triathlons continues to expand, the team delivering these world-class events increases.

Challenge Family today is pleased to announce the appointment Belinda Granger to the global team. Belinda will take on the recently created role as Pro Athlete Liaison and comes equipped with all the skills required to support the professional athletes across a number of platforms.

Belinda is one of the sport’s most admired people on and off the race course and brings a wealth of knowledge about the industry and from a professional athlete’s stand point.

“We are delighted to welcome Belinda to the team, she is a true champion in so many respects and will be a real asset to our team. Her core values reflect the Challenge Family’s focus on athletes and its commitment to being the authentic, quality triathlon brand,” said CEO Zibi Szlufcik.

“Anyone who knows Belinda will know her passion and energy for the sport and generosity in offering genuine help to professionals, age group athletes along with race directors and sponsors. This dedication has seen her endowed as a global ambassador for triathlon during her two decades of racing and remains one of the most popular athletes on the circuit.”

This will be one the assets she brings to her new role – working with athletes in their race planning while ensuring the needs of each race are met and implementing a number of projects ensuring best practices are met.

“I am beyond excited about my new appointment as pro liaison for Challenge Family. I have had mixed emotions about retiring from professional racing but this new position makes it so much easier. In my eyes it is a dream role and one I know I can excel at. Having been a professional athlete for the past 15 years I have a great understanding of an athlete’s needs. I have also been an avid supporter of the Challenge Series throughout my career and have always loved the support they give to all professional athletes. I cannot wait to get started,” said Belinda.

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Are ice baths a waste of time? http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/28/are-ice-baths-a-waste-of-time http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/28/are-ice-baths-a-waste-of-time#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:30:23 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49197

It’s a love/hate routine with triathletes: Peeling off the sweaty tri shorts after a long brick workout to soak in a tub full of ice ]]>

It’s a love/hate routine with triathletes: Peeling off the sweaty tri shorts after a long brick workout to soak in a tub full of ice water. It isn’t comfortable, but it’s necessary to accelerate recovery.

Or is it?

New research published in the January issue of Journal of Sports Sciences claim cold-water immersion “have no benefit in promoting recovery.” The study, which evaluated 24 male athletes after strenuous exercise, compared athletes without an ice bath to those in standing and seated cold-water immersion. Various markers of physiological stress, including Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), were measured before and up to 72 hours following the test.

“There is strong evidence that suggests that athletes feel better after an ice bath, which is likely why they are so popular,” says Dr. Jonathan Leeder of the English Institute of Sport, who led the study. “However if you objectively measure how indices such as muscle strength and power recover after an ice bath, the evidence is far less conclusive, with many research studies showing no effect.”

In fact, Leeder says new evidence suggests using ice baths may have a negative effect on adaptation to training: “It is suggested that the cold water blunts inflammation, but inflammation is a critical aspect of the repair and adaptation process, so it potentially shouldn’t be manipulated.”

For this reason, Leeder only endorses ice baths in competition scenarios, where the feel-good factor is important but training gains are not the focus.

Leeder, who also serves as a Physiologist for the British Cycling Team, suggests athletes in training skip the ice baths for a snack and a nap instead:

“There are three basics to optimal recovery for athletes: optimal nutrition, sleep and rest. It is our belief that the benefits of doing these three things well far outweighs the ice bath. A well-periodised training plan that allows for high-quality rest, alongside proper sleep and nutrition, is the best form of recovery.”

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Run specific strength exercises http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/28/run-specific-strength-exercises http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2015/01/28/run-specific-strength-exercises#comments Wed, 28 Jan 2015 12:30:25 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49203

You can develop your run strength by simply running, or you can improve the process by practising a range of run strength-specific ]]>

Deadlifts and front raises

Fire hydrants

Hip raises

Pushups

Pullovers
You can develop your run strength by simply running, or you can improve the process by practising a range of run strength-specific exercises.

Deadlifts And Front Raises
Muscle Targets
: Lower back, hamstrings, traps, delts, biceps, triceps

Equipment: Dumbbell or medicine ball, BOSU (advanced)

Form
1. Stand with your feet a bit wider than shoulder width. Tilt your pelvis backward and arch your back, with your knees slightly bent. Keep your pelvis tilted throughout the exercise, even as you straighten up and bend over again.

2. Bend forward at the hips, being careful not to round your back. Grip a dumbbell or medicine ball with both hands.

3. Straighten and raise the weight up over your head toward the ceiling in one smooth movement. When the weight is at the highest point of the movement, your back should still be slightly arched and your pelvis tilted backward.

Rep: Hold for a moment, then let the weight swing back down. This constitutes 1 rep.

# Reps: 10–20

Tip: To get accustomed to the deadlift position, practice gripping your sides with your thumbs at the back of your obliques and bend over.

Coach’s Note
This exercise combines two exercises into one complex movement. Our program does not incorporate the Deadlift as a stand-alone exercise because the major muscles used to perform the Deadlift—the glutes and the lower back muscles—can generate so much power that you need a heavy weight to challenge them; that kind of weight is usually found only in a gym. Instead, we get results by making the exercise more complex.

Advanced Form
Perform this movement from atop a BOSU, either side up.

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