Triathlete Europe http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com Europe's leading source for triathlon news and information. Tue, 06 Dec 2016 15:00:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.2 Nutrition must-do’s for 2017 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/06/nutrition-must-dos-for-2017 Tue, 06 Dec 2016 15:00:50 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=49170

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Start your new year—and training season—off right with my top five nutrition must-do’s for 2017. 1. Hydrate sufficiently (not just

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Start your new year—and training season—off right with my top five nutrition must-do’s for 2017.

1. Hydrate sufficiently (not just while training).
All too often I see hard-working and dedicated triathletes come into my nutrition practice office suffering needlessly due to inadequate hydrating. Track your fluid intake for the next week or so, and periodically throughout the year. Make it easier by using an app such as Water Alert Pro (£0.79, Itunes.com). At baseline, males need 3.7 litres (almost 1 gallon) daily, and females need 2.7 litres (more than 11 cups)—plus more when training or sweating heavily.

2. Eat healthy fats.
I spend countless hours each year explaining the importance of dietary fat to athletes. Savvy triathletes know that fats contain more calories per gram than carbs and protein. However, because they always want to be lean and Lycra-ready for race day, they wrongly cut out healthy fats such as nuts, seeds, avocados and olive oil to “save calories.” Do yourself a favour in 2016 and eat good fats with every meal. Doing so will not only enhance the taste of your food, but also the absorption of the vitamins and minerals you are working so hard to get. Additionally, these good fats are essential for hormone production, brain function and serve as potent anti-inflammatory agents, helping prevent many common injuries that endurance athletes face.

3. Prioritise your fruits and veggies.
Do I need to remind you why? How about the short list of reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and many cancers, preservation of both lean muscle mass and bone, and more dietary fibre—which makes both weight loss and weight maintenance easier. If you need a personalised recommendation on how much you should eat, check out Cdc.gov and use the fruit and vegetable calculator. If you want a basic guideline to start, aim for 2 cups of fruit and 2.5 cups of veggies daily—starting today!

4. Diversify your menu.
I know life gets busy (I too must squeeze training in before the sun rises to accommodate a hectic schedule), but it’s essential to take the time to plan out a varied menu for diverse nutrition. Try a new grain, vegetable or fruit this week. Buy an ethnic cookbook for a cuisine you love. Elicit suggestions from friends, family or social media for new recipes, ideas and cooking partners. Need suggestions for new things to try? Some of my favourites: spelt, wheatberries, Great Northern beans, mustard greens, radishes, garlic scape, bison and rambutan (it’s a fruit!).

5. Alkaline your life.
You may have recently read about the importance of alkalinity in our bodies and diet. A brief summary: Our blood pH is tightly controlled by our bodies, which has measures in place to help ensure it remains at certain levels. If you eat highly acidic foods, your body will help maintain balance by expelling more CO2, pulling calcium from bones to neutralise the acid and excrete more acid. To avoid depletion of important calcium, potassium and magnesium, it is important to focus on eating more alkaline foods (such as most fruits and vegetables, legumes, avocados, sweet potatoes, basil, rosemary) while decreasing your intake of acidic foods (such as animal products and processed foods). So if you needed just one more reason to eat more good fats, fruits and veggies—and reduce your intake of meats and highly processed foods—this is it.

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

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Three keys to finding the right run shoes http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/06/three-keys-to-finding-the-right-run-shoes Tue, 06 Dec 2016 14:00:32 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=50042

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Although bright colours and technological features catch the eye, finding a shoe that fits your needs is crucial. Start by visiting a

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Photo: Sandratsky Dmitriy / Shutterstock.com

Although bright colours and technological features catch the eye, finding a shoe that fits your needs is crucial. Start by visiting a running specialty shop and try on several pairs. Here’s how to know which one will keep you smiling after a couple hundred miles.

Know Yourself
Do you want a softer, cushier experience or a firmer and responsive ride?

“Most runners need some level of cushioning and protection to run long distances,” says Henry Guzman, co-owner of Flatirons Running.

The old paradigm of neutral, guidance, stability and motion control is largely outdated, but if you excessively pronate, some stability is still essential. Generally speaking, opt for a shoe that’s less supportive over one that is more controlling.

Understand a Good Fit
While it’s important to get the correct length, the width and volume of a shoe are most important.

“Step-in comfort is great, but you need to see how they feel when your foot moves in them,” says Shane O’Hara, manager of Marathon Sports in Boston.

Shoes should fit snug in the heel and mid-foot with no slippage, irritation or awkward sensations. Keep in mind that brands fit slightly differently.

Find the Right Offset
The heel-toe offset is the height difference between a shoe’s heel and forefoot. Recent studies have shown that a lower offset can improve running posture and facilitate more efficient form. But be careful about dropping too far too fast, says physical therapist and leading gait analyst Jay Dicharry.

“You might feel soreness in your Achilles tendon and lower calf muscles, and might need an adjustment period,” he says. “If a more moderate heel-toe drop (4–8mm) works for you, stick with that.”

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The Benefits Of A Two-A-Day Cycling Plan http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/06/the-benefits-of-a-two-a-day-cycling-plan-2 Tue, 06 Dec 2016 13:00:08 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=55178

Photo: TandemStock

Looking for a breakthrough on the bike? Consider riding twice a day. Trying to improve in three disciplines at once is a demanding juggling

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Photo: TandemStock

Photo: TandemStock

Photo: TandemStock

Looking for a breakthrough on the bike? Consider riding twice a day.

Trying to improve in three disciplines at once is a demanding juggling act. For athletes wanting to step up the distance or focus on getting better on the bike in particular, improvement often necessitates an increase in volume. Riding more miles means more time, which is not always easy to find with, say, a full-time job, family and social life.

One creative solution is to ride twice a day. Between time constraints and lifestyle challenges, a two-a-day cycling plan may help you become a better cyclist in a more efficient manner. Before you try it, here’s what to consider.

Potential Benefits

Aerobic miles: It’s safe to say most time-constrained age-groupers can benefit from additional aerobic training. Coach and physical therapist Carrie Smith has used this method with success in the past, riding twice a day for 4–5 days in a row and encouraging her athletes to try the double ride during training camps.  “I felt like I could have a higher quality of volume during that week by doing two 2-plus hour rides instead of one long ride each day,” Smith says.

Recovery: Though it’s common for high-level runners to run twice per day and label one a recovery workout, an easy cycling workout can be an even better workout for promoting recovery. Consider a very easy ride to loosen up the legs several hours after a hard workout.

Efficiency: Practicing the motion of a simple pedal stroke thousands of additional times is a way to work on your efficiency. And while technique is less of a factor in cycling performance than swimming, it’s hard to watch a beginner pedal a bicycle and say that technique doesn’t matter.

Metabolic boost: Everyone has different goals for cycling and not everyone sees success solely through the lens of performance improvement. As far as keeping your metabolism stoked, more frequent bouts of aerobic exercise is a great way to keep your engine burning all day long.

Time management: Many age-groupers would like to do longer races but always run into the same issue: When can I do my long ride so there’s minimal impact on work and family? You can squeeze in your longest run into a late night or early morning window if you have to, but a six-hour ride is nearly impossible to do on a weekday. While it’s important to do some long rides as a single session, splitting up the long ride is a way to work around this time issue.

RELATED: When To Run Twice In One Day

Considerations

If you’re ready to start adding in more rides, first consider your current fitness level, the proximity to your upcoming race(s) and session timing. “Logging aerobic miles might be easier and [result in] better quality with twice-a-day rides for experienced athletes needing more miles,” Smith says. “But for lower fitness levels or beginners who are wiped out after a 30–60-minute ride, two-a-days are not a great idea.”

The timing of hard and easy sessions is also an important consideration. Although you can do an easy commute in the morning and a tough interval ride in the evening, doing your structured ride as the first workout of the day will ensure you’re not trying to do hard efforts on tired legs.

Finally, consider your priorities. If you’re having trouble already getting in your runs and swims, the additional benefit of more riding may be wiped out by the cost of missing other key sessions. The off-season is a great time to cut back on other disciplines to give something like two-a-days a try.

RELATED: Becoming An Uberbiker

Try it:

As an age-grouper with family, work and other demands, how can you rack up 10 hours of riding per week and still have a weekend? Here is an example of a time-constrained athlete training for a longer race during a bike-focused period.  This athlete rarely has more than a two-hour block of time to spend cycling but wants to prepare himself for the demands of riding 50-plus miles during a race.

Tuesday
A.M. 1–1:30 Trainer interval ride with threshold, VO2max or anaerobic work, depending on focus and point in the season
P.M. Casual 1–1:30 group ride

Wednesday
A.M. or P.M. 1:00–2:00 Recovery ride

Thursday
1–1:30 Trainer interval ride with threshold,
VO2max or anaerobic work, depending on focus and point in the season

Sunday
4:00 total, split ride due to schedule:
A.M. Early morning 2:00 workout with race-specific (Zone 2/3) intervals
P.M. Casual 2:00 plus a 30 min run off the bike building into race intensity

 

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Everything To Know About Bilateral Breathing http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/06/everything-know-bilateral-breathing Tue, 06 Dec 2016 12:00:18 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=58400

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There are multiple reasons triathletes can benefit from being able to comfortably breathe to both sides while swimming. Breathing

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There are multiple reasons triathletes can benefit from being able to comfortably breathe to both sides while swimming. Breathing bilaterally helps create an even stroke, which moves a swimmer straighter through the water. A more balanced stroke will build muscles evenly, making an athlete less likely to have injury. And breathing away from the wind, waves, chop, and sun can be way more pleasant on race day.

Challenge yourself to develop your non-breathing side with these drills and tips:

1. Improve neck flexibility with light stretching and massage.

2. Pay attention as you take a breath to your dominant side. Compare and contrast your movements and technique with your weaker side. Notice if you are doing anything differently.

3. Breathing technique becomes easier as you move faster through the water. Try swimming with fins to provide an easy boost in speed.

4. Try a Hesitation Drill during your weak-side breath. Pause as your head is turned to the side and make sure your opposite arm is reaching straight forward and not pulling under your body.

5. Check the timing of your movements. You should begin to roll your head to the side as that arm passes under the same shoulder.

The breathing pattern

Bilateral breathing is often mistaken as breathing every third stroke. This can overwhelm some athletes who need to breathe more often. Fortunately, these two concepts are not synonymous. There are an infinite number of breathing patterns that allow you to breathe to both sides evenly. One example is to swim one length of the pool while breathing to the left side only, followed by one length of the pool breathing to the right side only. A common breathing pattern is 2–4 breaths on the right side, followed by one cycle of three strokes, and then 2–4 breaths on the left side. This frequent switch allows you to observe what is happening all around you during the race but still maintain a manageable.

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Your Off-Season Run Plan http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/06/your-off-season-run-plan Tue, 06 Dec 2016 11:00:22 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=32356

While a period of rest is definitely necessary for both body and soul, off-season run-focused workouts can play an important role in next

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While a period of rest is definitely necessary for both body and soul, off-season run-focused workouts can play an important role in next year’s performances.

To come up with an off-season run plan, consider the distances you’re training for, as well as your experience level and injury status. From there, mix and match the following advice from running experts to devise a plan to stay injury-free and run faster than ever come race season.

The Approach: Cut the mileage and intensity but keep the consistency.
After the competitive season, running coach Brendan Cournane, prescribes between one week and one month off running, followed by a period of easy running. “After a break, I have athletes start some ‘off-season’ condition- ing, which is usually two to six months of continued running, but at lower intensities and distances,” he says.

Apply it: Reduce your regular running mileage by 50–60 per cent and cut out much of the higher intensity work. “These are more maintenance workouts,” explains Cournane. “They reduce stress on the body, allow for muscle recovery and simultaneously keep the routine of exercise on a consistent frequency.” If you were previously doing two or more hard workouts a week, reduce that to one hard workout amid the easy, reduced mileage. As a result, you’ll maintain fitness but give your body and mind a break from the daily grind. This means fresh legs and renewed motivation when the season starts.

The Approach: Work on skills and technique.
“Have someone look at your running form and consider injuries and biomechanical issues, then commit to doing the drills that will help address those,” says Bob Hanisch, an exercise physiologist and certified coach at Peak Performance Professionals.

Apply it: While every athlete is different, Hanisch often suggests high knees, butt kicks, skipping drills, lunges and dynamic stretches. Find an area 30–40m wide and do these exercises two to three times per week to foster better knee drive, arm carriage and overall efficiency. “Improving form can help reduce injuries and increase strength and flexibility for the upcoming season,” says Hanisch. Since you should also be running less mileage, these 10–15-minute sessions are easy to fit in and will pay off big.

The Approach: Concentrate on core and flexibility work.
“Most triathletes have a lot of muscle imbalances when it comes to running, and I see fewer injuries when the season starts again if they’ve been working on strength and flexibility,” says Joy von Werder, certified coach.

Apply it: Von Werder suggests focusing on the entire core, including the hips, obliques and lower back, as those tend to be problem areas on the run. Rotational exercises with a medicine ball, lunges, and good old-fashioned push-ups and sit-ups are a great place to start. When you’re warmed up, include some light stretching for the hip flexors, IT bands, hamstrings, quads and any other potentially tight areas. Von Werder says that including strength and flexibility two times each week in the off-season will not only help you skirt injury, it’ll also assist in getting you back in peak shape sooner once the season begins.

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Long Course Weekend comes to Jervis Bay http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/06/long-course-weekend-comes-jervis-bay Tue, 06 Dec 2016 10:00:50 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=58397

Jervis Bay, NSW is to be home to the ‘new’ phenomenon of endurance sport, The Long Course Weekend (LCW). The event, which has its

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Jervis Bay, NSW is to be home to the ‘new’ phenomenon of endurance sport, The Long Course Weekend (LCW). The event, which has its origins in Tenby Wales where over 7500 athletes descend each year, will begin its International journey in Jervis Bay on the weekend of the 27th, 28th and 29th October 2017.

The unique event lasts three days and this fun, inclusive format is ideal for clubs, training groups and families to come along and enjoy the benefits of training and racing together.

The weekend kicks off on Friday evening, where the LCW athletes have The Swim to complete – a 3.8km open water swim that takes place at Jervis Bay. The Swim also has a 1.9km swim, 1.5km swim and 500m swim all to correspond with triathlons’ most popular distances.

On Saturday the attention turns to The Grand Fondo, a 180km ride of undulating countryside that also incorporates 90km, 40km and 20km events – distances to attract athletes of all abilities.

To finish the weekend, the athletes will complete The Run – a 42.2km marathon taking in the beautiful coastline of Jervis Bay and Huskinson. There is also a 21.1km run, 10km run and a 5km run which allows everyone to be involved.

More than 1500 competitors are expected to attend the Inaugural Jervis Bay LCW with approximately 200 athletes attempting to receive the Long Course Weekend medal, which entails completing all three of the longest distances. Successful LCW athletes will be awarded with the LCW 4th medal and polo shirt at the finish line presentation on Sunday after the marathon.

“This weekend is going to be a fantastic way for athletes from all genres of sport to come together and enjoy a full range of events. At Elite Energy we work hard to create experiences that will encourage people to get active and LCW fits our ethos perfectly. When Shane Smith from Sport 3 Events approached us to be the company that brings LCW to Australia, my team and I jumped at the opportunity. Jervis Bay will fall in love with this event, as will athletes from around Australia,” said Mark Emerton, owner of Elite Energy Sports, Australia’s premier event company.

LCW began in Tenby, Wales six years ago and has grown in numbers every year. Matthew Evans, Scott Powell and their team at Activity Wales Events are now taking this 3-day event around the world with new events to be announced in early 2017.

“Our team is excited about LCW Jervis Bay,” says Matthew Evans, Founder of LCW.

“We are so excited to be launching our first LCW outside the UK in Jervis Bay for a number of reasons.  Long Course Weekend is not just a race, it’s an experience.  To get this right you need to have a great team delivering the event and it has to be in the right location. It’s not about big conference centres and cities, but intimate relationships with the community and stunning landscapes.  This is why it is dubbed ‘the little big race’,” says Evans.

“We have a fantastic team under Mark and Shane, with not just their vast experience, but their passion for the athlete, supporters and the community. This event will change the face of Long Distance Events,” says Evans.

Jervis Bay lends itself to be the heart of endurance sport in Australia. With the highly successful Huskinson Long Course event held in February each year, the LCW will complement the stable of events already in the region.

“Shoalhaven lends itself to be the heart of endurance sport in Australia. With the highly successful Huskisson Long Course event held in February each year, the Long Course Weekend will compliment the events already in the region. We pride ourselves on our spectacular natural assets and we look forward to sharing many of Shoalhaven’s experiences with the competitors and their friends and family,” said Tourism Manager Coralie Bell.

About Jervis Bay

Jervis Bay’s famous white-sand beaches and clear turquoise waters are amongst the safest and most beautiful in the world. Coastal, marine and hinterland National Parks offer fantastic bushwalking, cycling tracks, Indigenous culture, camping spots, cliff-top lookouts and maritime heritage.

The many bay and ocean beaches, lagoons, secret coves and hidden creeks are perfect for swimming, kayaking, boating, fishing and standup paddle boarding.

Unspoiled coastal and country villages have local produce markets, boutique shops, art galleries and a terrific museum. The area boasts world-class cafes, restaurants, pubs, wine bars and a burgeoning music scene.

Jervis Bay is central to all the South Coast has to offer: Kangaroo Valley, Berry and Ulladulla all the same distance away and we are close to all the south coast wineries.

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Quick Set Monday: Time Out http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/05/quick-set-monyda-time-out Mon, 05 Dec 2016 15:00:22 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=58387

Most swim workouts are based on distances you must complete in certain intervals—10 100s on the 1:30, for instance. Here, we flip that

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Most swim workouts are based on distances you must complete in certain intervals—10 100s on the 1:30, for instance. Here, we flip that approach on its head, working off of time first. Think: How far can you go in 2 minutes while still getting to rest? It’s a fun break from tradition, and it’ll let you do the same workout with friends of all abilities. So without further ado, presenting a 1-hour set based entirely on time.

How to do it: Where there is a “??” in this swim set, plug in a distance that you can swim under 2:00 and still have enough time to rest on the wall and leave on the 2-minute interval. For example, if you swim 50 metres in 1:00, choose 75 as your distance for this set. You will complete the 75 in about 1:30 and have 30 seconds to rest on the wall before starting the next interval. If you swim 100 metres in 1:20, choose 125 as your distance.

10 min choice warm-up

6 min kick (30 sec hard kick, 60 sec easy kick, repeat)

3 min swim (all stroke or drills)

5 x ?? on 2:00 swim
(everyone starts together every 2:00)

5 min pull (steady effort)

3 min swim (all stroke or drills)

5 x ?? on 2:00 swim (everyone starts together every 2:00)

5 min choice cool-down

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How Do I Prevent Heartburn On Runs? http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/05/how-do-i-prevent-heartburn-on-runs Mon, 05 Dec 2016 14:00:20 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=54753

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Q: During evening run workouts, I get such bad heartburn that I have to take antacids. Is there something I can change in my diet to

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Q: During evening run workouts, I get such bad heartburn that I have to take antacids. Is there something I can change in my diet to prevent this?   

A: Likely (and luckily) yes! I work with people of all ages and abilities who struggle with the discomfort of reflux or heartburn. It is generally described as chest pain and burning, and is a result of inadequate closing of the lower esophageal sphincter, leading to a leaking of stomach acid and irritation of the esophagus. If you experience consistent heartburn, avoid the Four C’s (especially before a workout): caffeine, citrus, chocolate and carbonation, as well as fried and high-fat foods, all of which can be triggers. Keep your lunch and pre-training snack free of tomato, tomato soup, tomato sauce and raw onion. Try smaller, more frequent meals and snacks rather than three large, square meals per day—a good rule for all triathletes. Also avoid overly tight-waisted clothing both pre- and during workouts, and consider your bike position carefully, as a very aggressive, closed position can trigger more reflux symptoms on the bike.

Lauren Antonucci, R.D., is a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics, three-time Ironman finisher and the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City.

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5 Steps to Losing Weight This Winter http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/05/5-steps-losing-weight-winter Mon, 05 Dec 2016 13:00:39 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=58384

More people start weight-loss diets on Jan. 1 than on any other day of the year. The reason is primarily cultural, of course. Putting

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More people start weight-loss diets on Jan. 1 than on any other day of the year. The reason is primarily cultural, of course. Putting self-improvement resolutions into effect has become a traditional way to bring in the New Year.

Winter is also the best time for triathletes to pursue weight loss, but for a different reason. The goal of every triathlete is to perform to the best of their ability in races. Gaining fitness and shedding excess body fat are two effective ways to improve performance. However, the most effective dietary and training methods for gaining fitness are different from the most effective dietary and training methods for shedding excess body fat.

For this reason, it is best for triathletes to pursue these two objectives at different times. Obviously, fitness is the top priority during the summer racing season and the spring preparatory period. This leaves the winter as the ideal time to prioritise weight loss and to adopt the dietary and training methods that shed body fat most effectively.

Set aside four to eight weeks to function as a winter weight-loss focus phase. Use four weeks if you have just a little excess body fat to lose, six or eight if you’re well above your ideal racing weight. During this period, practice the following five dietary and training methods.

1. Count calories

When your primary goal is building fitness, it’s important that you eat enough to supply your body with enough energy to optimise your performance in training and your recovery between workouts. The best way to do this is to pay attention to your body’s hunger and satiety signals and allow these signals to regulate your food intake. In my experience as a sports nutritionist, athletes who instead limit themselves to prescribed calorie intakes tend to eat too little, sabotaging their own fitness development.

During a weight-loss focus phase, however, it does make sense to count calories. Specifically, you should aim for a moderate daily energy deficit of 300 to 500 calories. Research has shown that a moderate calorie shortfall yields significant weight loss in endurance athletes without sabotaging their training (provided you aren’t training at peak levels, as you shouldn’t be during the winter).

2. Eat more protein

High-protein diets are not conducive to endurance fitness building. A 2002 study found that runners who switched to a 30 percent protein diet experienced a nearly 10 percent decline in performance. Why? Research involving animals indicates that high-protein diets inhibit the creation of new mitochondria in the muscle cells in response to training, a crucial aspect of aerobic development.

However, when your primary goal is not gaining fitness but losing fat, a high-protein diet becomes a good thing. Studies show that elevated protein intake reduces appetite, making it easier to sustain a daily calorie deficit, and also increases resting metabolism, so more calories are burned outside of exercise. Aim to get 25 to 30 percent of your total calories from protein during your winter weight-loss focus phase. Here’s an example of what a 30 percent protein diet looks like:

Breakfast
Egg and vegetable scramble
Coffee

Snack
Fruit smoothie with protein powder

Lunch
Sausage and lentil soup
Whole grain bread

Snack
Celery sticks with peanut butter

Dinner
Chicken and broccoli stir fry
Quinoa

Snack
Greek yogurt with berries

3. Don’t cheat

Every high-performing triathlete whose diet I’ve studied eats a small number of unhealthy treats. Not only is it possible to attain maximum endurance fitness on an imperfect diet, but in a sense it’s even easier, because eating a treat here and there makes the diet as a whole more sustainable.

But within a weight-loss focus phase, it’s a good idea to eat as few treats as possible. Most athletes can muster the willpower to go treat-free for a few weeks, and doing so will give you that much more momentum in the direction of fat loss. Refined grains (e.g., most breads), sweets, processed meats, and foods containing added oils (including fried foods) should be avoided at this time.

4. Train less, but more intensely

Research has shown that endurance athletes of all experience, ability, and fitness levels improve the most when they do about 80 percent of their training at low intensity (i.e., below the ventilatory threshold, or about 77 percent of maximum heart rate) and the remaining 20 percent at moderate to high intensity. But the best way to train for weight loss is to do about half of your training at low intensity, half at high intensity, and little to none at moderate intensity.

Because high-intensity exercise is very stressful, the overall volume of training you do during a weight-loss focus phase should be significantly lower than it is within a race-focused training cycle.

5. Lift more weights

You probably noticed that the sample weekly training schedule given above includes as many strength workouts as it does swims, rides, or runs. There’s a reason for this. The true goal of a weight-loss focus phase is not really to lose weight, it’s to lose fat while preserving muscle. Research has shown that men and women who combine a calorie deficit with strength training lose more fat and less muscle than do people who eat less without lifting weights.

It’s a good idea to strength-train year-round, of course, but whereas two short gym sessions per week may be enough to keep you strong and injury-resistant at other times, three longer sessions will do more to help you get lean in a weight-loss focus phase. This shift in emphasis will also give you a reserve of strength—alongside a leaner body composition—to carry through the next racing season, during which strength training will necessarily be a lower priority.

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Ironman Weymouth 70.3 Video Highlights http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2016/12/05/ironman-weymouth-70-3-video-highlights Mon, 05 Dec 2016 12:00:52 +0000 http://triathlete-europe.competitor.com/?p=58378

The race season may be long and gone but this is an ideal time to start preparing and planning for next season. If you are a seasoned

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The race season may be long and gone but this is an ideal time to start preparing and planning for next season.

If you are a seasoned middle-distance racer or wanting to step up to this distance in 2017; then look no further than Ironman Weymouth 70.3 on the 17th September. Check out the video highlights from this year and enter here: Ironman Weymouth 70.3.

Ironman 70.3 Weymouth will bring thousands of athletes to England’s South Coast in September for the ultimate one-day test of endurance.

As host venue of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic sailing events, the Weymouth and Portland area is used to staging international sport at the highest level. It is a popular seaside holiday resort, with its fine Georgian seafront providing an impressive backdrop to the Bay’s long arc of fine, golden sand. The views from the bay are spectacular, stretching across the horizon taking in the World Heritage Jurassic Coastline. Weymouth’s beautiful, sandy beaches, rich heritage, and spectacular coastline make it an ideal location for racing.

Ironman 70.3 Weymouth offers 50 qualifying slots for the 2018 Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa.

 

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